Category Archives: tools

DBpedia citations & references challenge

In the latest release (2015-10) DBpedia started exploring the citation and reference data from Wikipedia and we were pleasantly surprised by the rich data we managed to extract.

This data holds huge potential, especially for the Wikidata challenge of providing a reference source for every statement. It describes not only a lot of bibliographical data, but also a lot of web pages and many other sources around the web.

The data we extract at the moment is quite raw and can be improved in many different ways. Some of the potential improvements are:

We welcome contributions that improve the existing citation dataset in any way; and we are open to collaboration and helping. Results will be presented at the next DBpedia meeting: 15 September 2016 in Leipzig, co-located with SEMANTiCS 2016. Each participant should submit a short description of his/her contribution by Monday 12 September 2016 and present his/her work at the meeting. Comments, questions can be posted on the DBpedia discussion & developer lists or in our new DBpedia ideas page.

Submissions will be judged by the Organizing Committee and the best two will receive a prize.

Organizing Committee

Stay tuned and follow us on facebook, twitter or visit our website for the latest news.

Your DBpedia Association

A retrospective of the 5th DBpedia community meeting in California

A belated Happy New Year to all DBpedia enthusiasts !!!

Two weeks of 2016 have already passed and it is about time to reflect on the past three months which were revolving around the 5th DBpedia meeting in the USA.

After 4 successful meetings in Poznan, Dublin, Leipzig and Amsterdam, we thought it is about time to cross the Atlantic and meet the US-part of the DBpedia community. On November 5th 2015, our 5th DBpedia Community meeting was held at the world famous Stanford University, in Palo Alto California.

First and foremost, we would like to thank Michel Dumontier, Associate Professor of Medicine at Stanford University, and hisIMG_20151105_192240  Laboratory for Biomedical Knowledge Discovery for hosting this great event and giving so many US-based DBpedia enthusiasts a platform for exchange and to meet in person. The event was constantly commented on and discussed not just inside University premises but also online, via Twitter #DBpedia  CA. We would also like to thank the rest of the organizers: Pablo Mendes, Marco Fossati, Dimitris Kontokostas and Sebastian Hellmann for devoting a lot of time to plan the meeting and coordinate with the presenters.

We set out to the US with two main goals. Firstly, we wanted DBpedia and Knowledge Graph professionals and enthusiasts to network and discuss ideas about how to improve DBpedia. Secondly, the event also aimed at finding new partners, developers and supporters to help DBpedia grow professionally, in terms of competencies and data, as well as to enlarge the DBpedia community itself to spread the word and to raise awareness of the DBpedia brand.

Therefore, we invited representatives of the best-known actors in the Data community such as:

  • Michel Dumontier, Stanford
  • Anshu Jain, IBM Watson
  • Nicolas Torzec, Yahoo!
  • Yves Raimond, Netflix
  • Karthik Gomadam, Independent
  • Joakim Soderberg, Blippar
  • Alkis Simitsis, HP Labs
  • Yashar Mehdad, Yahoo! Labs

…who addressed interesting topics and together with all the DBpedia enthusiasts engaged in productive discussion and raised controversial questions.

Pre-event

The meeting itself was co-located with an pre-event designed as workshop, giving the attending companies a lot of room and time to raise questions and discuss “hot topics”. Classification schemas and multilingualism have been on top of the list of topics that were most interesting for the companies invited. In this interactive setting, our guest from Evernote, BlippAR, World University and Wikimedia answered questions about the DBpedia ontology and mappings, Wikipedia categories as well as about similarities and differences with Wikidata.

Main Event

Following the pre-event, the main event attracted attendees with lightning talks from major companies interesting to the DBpedia community.

The host of the DBpedia Meeting, Michel Dumontier from Stanford opened the main event with a short introduction of his group’s focus in biomedical data. He and his group currently focus on integrating datasets to extract maximal value from data. Right in the beginning of the DBpedia meeting, Dumontier highlighted the value of already existing yet unexploited data out there.

During the meeting there have been two main thematic foci, onDSC00807e concerning the topics companies were interested in and raised during the session. Experts from Yahoo, Netflix, Diffbot, IBM Watson and Unicode addressed issue such as fact extraction from text via NLP, knowledge base construction techniques and recommender systems leveraging data from a knowledge base and multilingual abbreviation datasets.

The second focus of this event revolved around DBpedia and encyclopedic Knowledge Graphs including augmented reality addressed by BlippAR and by Nuance. We have some of the talks summed up for you here. Also check out the slides provided in addition to the summary of some talks to get a deeper insight into the event.

Nicolas Torzec, Yahoo! – Wikipedia, DBpedia and the Yahoo! Knowledge Graph

He described how DBpedia played a key role in the beginning of the Knowledge Graph effort at Yahoo! They decided on using the Extraction Framework directly, not the provided data dumps, which allowed them to continuously update as Wikipedia changed. Yashar, also from Yahoo! focused on multilingual NE detection and linking. He described how users make financial choices based on availability of products in their local language, which highlights the importance of multilinguality (also a core objective of the DBpedia effort).

Anshu Jain,  IBM Watson  – Watson Knowledge Graph – DBpedia Meetup

The focus of this presentation was the effort by IBM Watson team  their effort as not building a knowledge graph, but building a platform for working with knowledge graphs. For them, graph is just an abstraction, not a data structure. He highlighted that context is very important, and one

 

Yves Raimond, Netflix – Knowledge Graphs @ NetflixYves Raimond from Netflix observed that in their platform, every impression is a recommendation. They rely on lots of machine learning algorithms, and pondered on the role of knowledge graphs in that setting. Will everything (user + metadata) end up in a graph so that algorithms learn from that?Click here for the complete presentation.

Joakim Soderberg, BlippAR –

Joakim Soderberg mentioned that at Blippar it’s all about the experience. They are focusing on augmented reality, which can benefit from information drawn from many sources including DBpedia.

David Martin, Nuance – using DBpedia with Nuance

David Martin from Nuance talked about how DBpedia is used as a source of named entities. He observes that multi role ranking is an important issue, for instance, the difference in the role of Arnold Schwarzenegger as politician or actor. Click here for the complete presentation.

Karthik Gomadam, Accenture Technology Labs – Rethinking the Enterprise Data Stack

Karthik Gomadam discussed data harmonization in the context of linked enterprise data.

Alkis Simitsis, Hewlett Packard – Complex Graph Computations over Enterprise Data

He talked about complex graph computations over enterprise data, while Georgia Koutrika from HP Labs presented their solution for fusing knowledge into recommendations.

Other topics discussed were:

  • Steven Loomis, IBM – Automatically extracted abbreviated data with Dbpedia
  • Scott McLeod, World University and School – MIT Open Courseware with Wikipedia. Classes in virtual worlds.
  • Diffbot’s developers talked about structuring the Web with their product with the help of DBpedia and DBpedia Spotlight.

You find some more presentations here:

 

Feedback from attendees and via our Twitter stream #DBpediaCA was generally very positive and insightful. The choice of invited talks was appreciated unanimously, and so was the idea of having lightning talks. In the spirit of previous DBpedia Meetings, we allocated time for all attendees that were interested in speaking. Some commented that they would have liked to have more time to ask questions and discuss, while others thought the meeting was too late. We will consider the trade-offs and try to improve in the next iteration. There was strong support from attendees for meeting again as soon as possible!

So now, we are looking forward to the next DBpedia community meeting which will be held on February 12, 2016 in the Hague, Netherlands. So, save the date and visit the event page. We will keep you informed via the DBpedia Website and Blog.                   

Finally, we would like to thank Yahoo! for sponsoring the catering during the DBpedia community meeting. We would also like to acknowledge Google Summer of Code as the reason Marco and Dimitris were in California and for covering part of their travel expenses.

The event was initiated by the DBpedia association. The following people received travel grants by the DBpedia association: Marco Fossati; Dimitris Kontokostas; Joachim Daiber

DBpedia Spotlight V0.7 released

DBpedia Spotlight is an entity linking tool for connecting free text to DBpedia through the recognition and disambiguation of entities and concepts from the DBpedia KB.

We are happy to announce Version 0.7 of DBpedia Spotlight, which is also the first official release of the probabilistic/statistical implementation.

More information about as well as updated evaluation results for DBpedia Spotlight V0.7 are found in this paper:

Joachim Daiber, Max Jakob, Chris Hokamp, Pablo N. Mendes: Improving Efficiency and Accuracy in Multilingual Entity ExtractionISEM2013. 

The changes to the statistical implementation include:

  • smaller and faster models through quantization of counts, optimization of search and some pruning
  • better handling of case
  • various fixes in Spotlight and PigNLProc
  • models can now be created without requiring a Hadoop and Pig installation
  • UIMA support by @mvnural
  • support for confidence value

See the release notes at [1] and the updated demos at [4].

Models for Spotlight 0.7 can be found here [2].

Additionally, we now provide the raw Wikipedia counts, which we hope will prove useful for research and development of new models [3].

A big thank you to all developers who made contributions to this version (with special thanks to Faveeo and Idio). Huge thanks to Jo for his leadership and continued support to the community.

Cheers,
Pablo Mendes,

on behalf of Joachim Daiber and the DBpedia Spotlight developer community.

[1] – https://github.com/dbpedia-spotlight/dbpedia-spotlight/releases/tag/release-0.7

[2] – http://spotlight.sztaki.hu/downloads/

[3] – http://spotlight.sztaki.hu/downloads/raw

[4] – http://dbpedia-spotlight.github.io/demo/

(This message is an adaptation of Joachim Daiber’s message to the DBpedia Spotlight list. Edited to suit this broader community and give credit to him.)

Call for Ideas and Mentors for GSoC 2014 DBpedia + Spotlight joint proposal (please contribute within the next days)

We started to draft a document for submission at Google Summer of Code 2014:
http://dbpedia.org/gsoc2014

We are still in need of ideas and mentors.  If you have any improvements on DBpedia or DBpedia Spotlight that you would like to have done, please submit it in the ideas section now. Note that accepted GSoC students will receive about 5000 USD for a three months, which can help you to estimate the effort and size of proposed ideas. It is also ok to extend/amend existing ideas (as long as you don’t hi-jack them). Please edit here:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/13YcM-LCs_W3-0u-s24atrbbkCHZbnlLIK3eyFLd7DsI/edit?pli=1

Becoming a mentor is also a very good way to get involved with DBpedia. As a mentor you will also be able to vote on proposals, after Google accepts our project. Note that it is also ok, if you are a researcher and have a suitable student to submit an idea and become mentor. After acceptance by Google the student then has to apply for the idea and get accepted.

Please take some time this week to add your ideas and apply as a mentor, if applicable. Feel free to improve the introduction as well and comment on the rest of the document.

Information on GSoC in general can be found here:
http://www.google-melange.com/gsoc/homepage/google/gsoc2014

Thank you for your help,
Sebastian and Dimitris

New DBpedia Overview Article

We are pleased to announce that a new overview article for DBpedia is available.

The article covers several aspects of the DBpedia community project:

  • The DBpedia extraction framework.
  • The mappings wiki as the central structure for maintaining the community-curated DBpedia ontology.
  • Statistics on the multilingual support in DBpedia.
  • DBpedia live synchronisation with Wikipedia.
  • Statistics on the interlinking of DBpedia with other parts of the LOD cloud (incoming and outgoing links).
  • Several usage statistics: What kind of queries are asked against DBpedia and how did that change over the past years? How much traffic do the official static and live endpoint as well as the download server have? What are the most popular DBpedia datasets?
  • A description of use cases and applications of DBpedia in several areas (drop me mail if important applications are missing).
  • The relation of DBpedia to the YAGO, Freebase and WikiData projects.
  • Future challenges for the DBpedia project.

After our ISWC 2009 paper on DBpedia, this is the (long overdue) new reference article for DBpedia, which should provide a good introduction to the project. We submitted the article as a system report to the Semantic Web journal.

Download article as PDF.

DBpedia Spotlight – Text Annotation Toolkit released

We are happy to announce a first release of DBpedia Spotlight – Shedding Light on the Web of Documents. 

The amount of data in the Linked Open Data cloud is steadily increasing. Interlinking text documents with this data enables the Web of Data to be used as background knowledge within document-oriented applications such as search and faceted browsing. 

DBpedia Spotlight is a tool for annotating mentions of DBpedia resources in text, providing a solution for linking unstructured information sources to the Linked Open Data cloud through DBpedia. The DBpedia Spotlight Architecture is composed by the following modules:

  • Web application, a demonstration client (HTML/Javascript UI) that allows users to enter/paste text into a Web browser and visualize the resulting annotated text.

  • Web Service, a RESTful Web API that exposes the functionality of annotating and/or disambiguating entities in text. The service returns XML, JSON or RDF.

  • Annotation Java / Scala API, exposing the underlying logic that performs the annotation/disambiguation.

  • Indexing Java / Scala API, executing the data processing necessary to enable the annotation/disambiguation algorithms used.

More information about DBpedia Spotlight can be found at: 

http://spotlight.dbpedia.org 

DBpedia Spotlight is provided under the terms of the Apache License, Version 2.0. Part of the code uses LingPipe under the Royalty Free License.

 

The source code can be downloaded from: 

http://sourceforge.net/projects/dbp-spotlight 

The development of DBpedia Spotlight was supported by: 

  • Neofonie GmbH, a Berlin-based company offering leading technologies in the area of Web search, social media and mobile applications (http://www.neofonie.de/).

  • The European Commission through the project LOD2 – Creating Knowledge out of Linked Data (http://lod2.eu/). 

Lots of thanks to:

  • Andreas Schultz for his help with the SPARQL endpoint.

  • Paul Kreis for his help with evaluations.

  • Robert Isele and Anja Jentzsch for their help in early stages with the DBpedia extraction framework.

Cheers,

 Pablo N. Mendes, Max Jakob, Andrés García-Silva and Chris Bizer.