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DBpedia+Spotlight accepted @ Google Summer of Code 2013

Google Summer of Code (GSoC) is a global program that offers post-secondary student developers (ages 18 and older, BSc, MSc, PhD)  stipends to write code for various open source software projects. Since its inception in 2005, the program has brought together over 6,000 successful student participants and over 3,000 mentors from over 100 countries worldwide, all for the love of code.

DBpedia participated successfully in last’s year GSoC as DBpedia Spotlight. We were allowed with 4 students (out of a total 37 applications) and managed to enhance DBpedia Spotlight in time performance, accuracy and extra functionality.  We are thrilled to announce, that we were accepted again in GSoC 2013. We are participating with all DBpedia-family products this time – that is DBpedia, DBpedia Spotlight and DBpedia Wiktionary – and we hope we share the same luck, again.

This year we have  brand new and exciting ideas so, if you know energetic students (BSc, MSc, PhD) interested in working with DBpedia, text processing, and semantics, please encourage them to apply!

If you are a student, the application period starts in 2 weeks (deadline May 3rd). Judging from last year’s competition, writing a good application can be a really hard task so you should start preparing from now. We already created a dedicated mailing list and a few  warm-up tasks ( to get you familiar with our technologies) and we will of course be always available to any questions.

So go ahead, choose your idea, write your application and impress us;)

http://www.google-melange.com/gsoc/org/google/gsoc2013/dbpediaspotlight

On behalf of the DBpedia GSoC team,

Dimitris Kontokostas

OpenData Challenge awards 20.000€ prizes to open public data apps

European public bodies produce thousands upon thousands of datasets every year – about everything from how our tax money is spent to the quality of the air we breathe.

The Opendata competition aims to challenge designers, developers, journalists, researchers and the general public to come up with something useful, valuable or interesting using open public data.

There are four main strands to the competition:

  • Ideas – Anyone can suggest an idea for projects which reuse public information to do something interesting or useful.
  • Apps – Teams of developers can submit working applications which reuse public information.
  • Visualisations – Designers, artists and others can submit interesting or insightful visual representations of public information.
  • Datasets – We encourage the submission of any form of open datasets produced by public governmental bodies, either submitted directly by the public body or by developers or others who have transformed, cleaned or interlinked the data.
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    The competition is open til 5th June midnight. The winners will be selected by an all star cast of open data gurus – and announced in mid June at the European Digital Assembly in Brussels. More information can be found at: http://opendatachallenge.org/

    DBpedia 3.6 AMI Available

    In line with prior releases of DBpedia, there is a new 3.6 edition of the DBpedia AMI available from Amazon EC2.

    What is a DBpedia AMI?

    A preconfigured Virtuoso Cluster Edition database that includes a preloaded DBpedia dataset. The entire deliverable is packaged as an Amazon Machine Instance (AMI); which is a cloud hosted virtual machine.

    Why is it Important?

    It enables you to productively exploit the power of the DBpedia within minutes. Basically, you can make DBpedia instances that serve you personal or service  specific needs. Thus, you do not have to constrain your use of DBpedia via the live instance which is configured for Web Scale use, based on server side constraints that affect concurrent connections, query timeouts, and result set sizes.

    How do I use it?

    Simply follow the instructions in the DBpedia AMI guide which boils down to:

    1. Instantiating a Virtuoso EC2 AMI
    2. Mounting the Amazon Elastic Block Storage (EBS) snapshot that hosts the preloaded Virtuoso Database.

    Enjoy!

    DBpedia in ReadWriteWeb’s Top 10 Semantic Web Products of 2009

    The new year is slowly approaching and people start compiling their top x lists of 2009, with x usually ranging between 10 and 365. 😉

    The popular Web technology blog ReadWriteWeb has chosen x with value 10 and picked DBpedia as one of their top Semantic Web products of 2009. Its actually the only non-commercial community project in the list and in good company with products such as Google’s Search Options and Rich Snippets, Apperture and Data.gov. Other picks, which btw. heavily use or link to DBpedia, include OpenCalais, Freebase, BBC Music and Zemanta.

    Read the full article at http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/top_10_semantic_web_products_of_2009.php

    Want to bring your Blog, Wiki, WebApp to the Semantic Web?

    DBpedia exposes semantics extracted from one of the largest information sources on the Web. But one of the nice things about the Web is the variety and wealth of content (including your Blog, Wiki, CMS or other WebApp). In order to make this large variety of small Websites better mashable and bring them on the Semantic Web the makers of DBpedia released technologies, which dramatically simplify the “semantification” of your Websites. Please check out Triplify (a generic plugin for Webapps with preconfigurations for Drupal, WordPress, WackoWiki), D2RQ (a Java software for mapping and serving relational DB content for the Semantic Web) and Virtuoso (a comprehensive DB, knowledge store infrastructure).

    flickr photo collection links added to DBpedia

    Christian Becker (Freie Universität Berlin) has implemented a wrapper around flickr which generates photo collections depicting DBpedia concepts. See flickr wrappr for details. We have interlinked all DBpedia concepts with the corresponding photo collections. You can now use any Semantic Web browser to navigate from a DBpedia concept to flickr  photos depicting it by following the dbpedia:hasPictureCollection property. This means an additional 30-50 million photos are accessible through DBpedia.

    For example, click on the URIs below or paste them into your Semantic Web browser:

    Photos depicting Brandenburg Gate: http://www4.wiwiss.fu-berlin.de/flickrwrappr/photos/Brandenburg_Gate
    DBpedia URI for Brandenburg Gate : http://dbpedia.org/resource/Brandenburg_Gate