Tag Archives: DBpedia

A year with DBpedia – Retrospective Part Two

Retrospective Part II. Welcome to the second part of our journey around the world with DBpedia. This time we are taking you to Greece, Germany, to Australia and finally France.

Let the travels begin.

Welcome to Thessaloniki, Greece & ESWC

DBpedians from the Portuguese Chapter presented their research results during ESWC 2018 in Thessaloniki, Greece.  the team around Diego Moussalem developed a demo to extend MAG  to support Entity Linking in 40 different languages. A special focus was put on low-resources languages such as Ukrainian, Greek, Hungarian, Croatian, Portuguese, Japanese and Korean. The demo relies on online web services which allow for an easy access to (their) entity linking approaches. Furthermore, it can disambiguate against DBpedia and Wikidata. Currently, MAG is used in diverse projects and has been used largely by the Semantic Web community. Check the demo via http://bit.ly/2RWgQ2M. Further information about the development can be found in a research paper, available here

 

Welcome back to Leipzig Germany

With our new credo “connecting data is about linking people and organizations”, halfway through 2018, we finalized our concept of the DBpedia Databus. This global DBpedia platform aims at sharing the efforts of OKG governance, collaboration, and curation to maximize societal value and develop a linked data economy.

With this new strategy, we wanted to meet some DBpedia enthusiasts of the German DBpedia Community. Fortunately, the LSWT (Leipzig Semantic Web Tag) 2018 hosted in Leipzig, home to the DBpedia Association proofed to be the right opportunity.  It was the perfect platform to exchange with researchers, industry and other organizations about current developments and future application of the DBpedia Databus. Apart from hosting a hands-on DBpedia workshop for newbies we also organized a well-received WebID -Tutorial. Finally,  the event gave us the opportunity to position the new DBpedia Databus as a global open knowledge network that aims at providing unified and global access to knowledge (graphs).

Welcome down under – Melbourne Australia

Further research results that rely on DBpedia were presented during ACL2018, in Melbourne, Australia, July 15th to 20th, 2018. The core of the research was DBpedia data, based on the WebNLG corpus, a challenge where participants automatically converted non-linguistic data from the Semantic Web into a textual format. Later on, the data was used to train a neural network model for generating referring expressions of a given entity. For example, if Jane Doe is a person’s official name, the referring expression of that person would be “Jane”, “Ms Doe”, “J. Doe”, or  “the blonde woman from the USA” etc.

If you want to dig deeper but missed ACL this year, the paper is available here.

 

Welcome to Lyon, France

In July the DBpedia Association travelled to France. With the organizational support of Thomas Riechert (HTWK, InfAI) and Inria, we finally met the French DBpedia Community in person and presented the DBpedia Databus. Additionally, we got to meet the French DBpedia Chapter, researchers and developers around Oscar Rodríguez Rocha and Catherine Faron Zucker.  They presented current research results revolving around an approach to automate the generation of educational quizzes from DBpedia. They wanted to provide a useful tool to be applied in the French educational system, that:

  • helps to test and evaluate the knowledge acquired by learners and…
  • supports lifelong learning on various topics or subjects. 

The French DBpedia team followed a 4-step approach:

  1. Quizzes are first formalized with Semantic Web standards: questions are represented as SPARQL queries and answers as RDF graphs.
  2. Natural language questions, answers and distractors are generated from this formalization.
  3. We defined different strategies to extract multiple choice questions, correct answers and distractors from DBpedia.
  4. We defined a measure of the information content of the elements of an ontology, and of the set of questions contained in a quiz.

Oscar R. Rocha and Catherine F. Zucker also published a paper explaining the detailed approach to automatically generate quizzes from DBpedia according to official French educational standards. 

 

 

Thank you to all DBpedia enthusiasts that we met during our journey. A big thanks to

With this journey from Europe to Australia and back we provided you with insights into research based on DBpedia as well as a glimpse into the French DBpedia Chapter. In our final part of the journey coming up next week, we will take you to Vienna,  San Francisco and London.  In the meantime, stay tuned and visit our Twitter channel or subscribe to our DBpedia Newsletter.

 

Have a great week.

Yours DBpedia Association

Retrospective: GSoC 2018

With all the beta-testing, the evaluations of the community survey part I and part II and the preparations for the Semantics 2018 we lost almost sight of telling you about the final results of GSoC 2018. Following we present you a short recap of this year’s students and projects that made it to the finishing line of GSoC 2018.

 

Et Voilà

We started out with six students that committed to GSoC projects. However, in the course of the summer, some dropped out or did not pass the midterm evaluation. In the end, we had three finalists that made it through the program.

Meet Bharat Suri

… who worked on “Complex Embeddings for OOV Entities”. The aim of this project was to enhance the DBpedia Knowledge Base by enabling the model to learn from the corpus and generate embeddings for different entities, such as classes, instances and properties.  His code is available in his GitHub repository. Tommaso Soru, Thiago Galery and Peng Xu supported Bharat throughout the summer as his DBpedia mentors.

Meet Victor Fernandez

.. who worked on a “Web application to detect incorrect mappings across DBpedia’s in different languages”. The aim of his project was to create a web application and API to aid in automatically detecting inaccurate DBpedia mappings. The mappings for each language are often not aligned, causing inconsistencies in the quality of the RDF generated. The final code of this project is available in Victor’s repository on GitHub. He was mentored by Mariano Rico and Nandana Mihindukulasooriya.

Meet Aman Mehta

.. whose project aimed at building a model which allows users to query DBpedia directly using natural language without the need to have any previous experience in SPARQL. His task was to train a Sequence-2-Sequence Neural Network model to translate any Natural Language Query (NLQ) into the corresponding sentence encoding SPARQL query. See the results of this project in Aman’s GitHub repositoryTommaso Soru and Ricardo Usbeck were his DBpedia mentors during the summer.

Finally, these projects will contribute to an overall development of DBpedia. We are very satisfied with the contributions and results our students produced.  Furthermore, we like to genuinely thank all students and mentors for their effort. We hope to be in touch and see a few faces again next year.

A special thanks goes out to all mentors and students whose projects did not make it through.

GSoC Mentor Summit

Now it is the mentors’ turn to take part in this year GSoC mentor summit, October 12th till 14th. This year, Mariano Rico and Thiago Galery will represent DBpedia at the event. Their task is to engage in a vital discussion about this years program, about lessons learned, highlights and drawbacks they experienced during the summer. Hopefully, they return with new ideas from the exchange with mentors from other open source projects. In turn, we hope to improve our part of the program for students and mentors.

Sit tight, follow us on Twitter and we will update you about the event soon.

Yours DBpedia Association

DBpedia Chapters – Survey Evaluation – Episode One

DBpedia Chapters – Challenge Accepted

The DBpedia community currently comprises more than 20 language chapters, ranging from  Basque, Japanese to Portuguese and Ukrainian. Managing such a variety of chapters is a huge challenge for the DBpedia Association because individual requirements are as diverse as the different languages the chapters represent. There are chapters that started out back in 2012 such as DBpediaNL. Others like the Catalan chapter are brand new and have different haves and needs.

So, in order to optimize chapter development, we aim to formalize an official DBpedia Chapter Consortium. It permits a close dialogue with the chapters in order to address all relevant matters regarding communication, organization as well as technical issues. We want to provide the community with the best basis to set up new chapters and to maintain or develop the existing ones.

Our main targets for this are to: 

  • improve general chapter organization,
  • unite all DBpedia chapters with central DBpedia,
  • promote better communication and understanding and,
  • create synergies for further developments and make easier the access to information about which is done by all DBpedia bodies

As a first step, we needed to collect information about the current state of things.  Hence, we conducted two surveys to collect the necessary information. One was directed at chapter leads and the other one at technical heads. 

In this blog-post, we like to present you the results of the survey conducted with chapter leads.  It addressed matters of communication and organizational relevance. Unfortunately, only nine out of 21 chapters participated, so the respective outcome of the survey speaks only for roughly 42% of all DBpedia chapters.

Chapter-Survey  – Episode One

Most chapters have very little personnel committed to the work done for the chapter, due to different reasons. 66 % of the chapters have only one till four people being involved in the core work. Only one chapter has about ten people working on it.

Overall, the chapters use various marketing channels for promotion, visibility and outreach. The website as well as event participation, Twitter and Facebook are among the most favourite channels they use. 

The following chart shows how chapters currently communicate organizational and communication issues in their respective chapter and to the DBpedia Association.

 

 

The second one explicit that ⅓ of the chapters favour an exchange among chapters and with the DBpedia Association via the discussion mailing list as well as regular chapter calls.

 

The survey results show that 66,6% of the chapters currently do not consider their current mode of communication efficient enough. They think that their communication with the DBpedia Association should improve.

 

As pointed out before, most chapters only have little personnel resources. It is no wonder that most of them need help to improve the work and impact of chapter results. The following chart shows the kind of support chapters require to improve their overall work, organization and communication. Most noteworthy, technical, marketing and organization support are hereby the top three aspects the chapters need help with. 

 

 

The good news is all of the chapters maintain a DBpedia Website. However, the frequency of updates varies among them. See the chart on the right.

 

 

 

Earlier this year, we announced that we like to align all chapter websites with the main DBpedia website. That includes a common structure and a corporate design, similar to the main one.  Above all, this is important for the overall image and recognition factor of DBpedia in the tech community. With respect to that, we inquired whether chapters would like to participate in an alignment of the websites or not.

 

 

 

With respect to marketing support, the chapters require from the Association, more than 50% of the chapters like to be frequently promoted via the main DBpedia twitter channel.

 

 

Good news: just forward us your news or tag us with @dbpedia and we will share ’em.

Almost there.

Finally, we asked about chapters requirements to improve their work and, the impact of their chapters’ results. 

 

Bottom line

All in all, we are very grateful for your contribution. Those data will help us to develop a strategy to work towards the targets mentioned above. We will now use this data to conceptualize a little program to assist chapters in their organization and marketing endeavours. Furthermore, the information given will also help us to tackle the different issues that arose, implement the necessary support and improve chapter development and chapter visibility.

In episode two, we will delve into the results of the technical survey. Sit tight and follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or subscribe to our newsletter.

Finally, one last remark. If you want to promote news of your chapter or otherwise like to increase its visibility, you are always welcome to:

  • forward us the respective information to be promoted via our marketing channels 
  • use your own Twitter channel and tag your post with @dbpedia,  so we can retweet your news. 
  • always use #dbpediachapters

Looking forward to your news.

Yours

DBpedia Association

Beta-Test Updates

While everyone at the DBpedia Association was preparing for the SEMANTiCS Conference in Vienna, we also managed to reach an important milestone regarding the beta-test for our data release tool.

First and foremost, already 3500 files have been published with the plugin. These files will be part of the new DBpedia release and are available on our LTS repository.

Secondly, the documentation of the testing has been brought into good shape. Feel free to drop by and check it out.
Thirdly, we reached our first interoperability goal. The current metadata is sufficient to produce RSS 1.0 feeds. See here for further information. We also defined a loose roadmap on top of the readme, where interoperability to DCAT and DCAT-AP has high priority.

 

Now we have some time to support you and work one on one and also prepare the configurations to help you set up the data releases. Lastly, we already received data from DNB and SUMO, so we will start to look into these more closely.

Thanks to all the beta-testers for your nice work.

We keep you posted.

Yours

DBpedia Association

Meet the DBpedia Chatbot

This year’s GSoC is slowly coming to an end with final evaluations already being submitted. In order to bridge the waiting time until final results are published, we like to draw your attention to a former project and great tool that was developed during last years’ GSoC.

Meet the DBpedia Chatbot. 

DBpedia Chatbot is a conversational Chatbot for DBpedia which is accessible through the following platforms:

  1. A Web Interface
  2. Slack
  3. Facebook Messenger

Main Purpose

The bot is capable of responding to users in the form of simple short text messages or through more elaborate interactive messages. Users can communicate or respond to the bot through text and also through interactions (such as clicking on buttons/links). There are 4 main purposes for the bot. They are:

  1. Answering factual questions
  2. Answering questions related to DBpedia
  3. Expose the research work being done in DBpedia as product features
  4. Casual conversation/banter
Question Types

The bot tries to answer text-based questions of the following types:

Natural Language Questions
  1. Give me the capital of Germany
  2. Who is Obama?
Location Information
  1. Where is the Eiffel Tower?
  2. Where is France’s capital?
Service Checks

Users can ask the bot to check if vital DBpedia services are operational.

  1. Is DBpedia down?
  2. Is lookup online?
Language Chapters

Users can ask basic information about specific DBpedia local chapters.

  1. DBpedia Arabic
  2. German DBpedia
Templates

These are predominantly questions related to DBpedia for which the bot provides predefined templatized answers. Some examples include:

  1. What is DBpedia?
  2. How can I contribute?
  3. Where can I find the mapping tool?
Banter

Messages which are casual in nature fall under this category. For example:

  1. Hi
  2. What is your name?

if you like to have a closer look at the internal processes and how the chatbot was developed, check out the DBpedia GitHub pages. 

DBpedia Chatbot was published on wiki.dbpedia.org and is one of many other projects and applications featuring DBpedia.

Powered by WPeMatico

In case you want your DBpedia based tool or demo to publish on our website just follow the link and submit your information, we will do the rest.

 

Yours

DBpedia Association

Beta-tests for the DBpedia Databus commence

Finally, we are proud to announce that the beta-testing of our data release tool for data releases on the DBpedia Databus is about to start.

In the past weeks, our developers at DBpedia  have been developing a new data release tool to release datasets on the DBpedia Databus. In that context, we are still looking for beta-testers who have a dataset they wish to release.  Sign up here and benefit from an increased visibility for your dataset and your work done.

We are now preparing the first internal test with our own dataset to ensure the data release tool is ready for the testers. During the testing process, beta-testers will discuss occurring problems, challenges and ideas for improvement via the DBpedia #releases channel on Slack to profit from each other’s knowledge and skills. Issues are documented via GitHub.

The whole testing process for the data release tool follows a 4-milestones plan:

Milestone One: Every tester needs to have a WebID to release data on the DBpedia Databus. In case you are interested in how to set up a WebID, our tutorial will help you a great deal.

Milestone Two: For their datasets, testers will generate DataIDs, that provide detailed descriptions of the datasets and their different manifestations as well as relations to agents like persons or organizations, in regard to their rights and responsibilities.

Milestone Three: This milestone is considered as achieved if an RSS feed feature can be generated. Additionally, bugs, that arose during the previous phases should have been fixed. We also want to collect the testers particular demands and wishes that would benefit the tool or the process. A second release can be attempted to check how integrated fixes and changes work out.

Milestone Four: This milestone marks the final upload of the dataset to the DBpedia Databus which is hopefully possible in about 3 weeks.

For updates on the beta-test, follow this link.

Looking forward to working with you…

Yours,

DBpedia Association

 

PS: In case you want to get one of the last spots in the beta-testing team, just sign up here and get yourself a WebID and start testing.

DBpedia supports young developers

Supporting young and aspiring developers has always been part of DBpedia‘s philosophy. Through various internships and collaborations with programmes such as Google Summer of Code, we were able to not only meet aspiring developers but also establish long-lasting relationships with these DBpedians ensuring a sustainable progress for and with DBpedia.  For 6 years now, we have been part of Google Summer of Code, one of our favorite programmes. This year, we are also taking part in Coding da Vinci, a German-based cultural data hackathon, where we support young hackers, coders and smart minds with DBpedia datasets.

DBpedia at Google Summer of Code 2018

This year, DBpedia will participate for the sixth time in a row in the Google Summer of Code program (GSoC). Together with our amazing mentors, we drafted 9 project ideas which GSOC applicants could apply to. Since March 12th, we received many proposal drafts out of which 12 final projects proposals have been submitted. Competition is very high as student slots are always limited. Our DBpedia mentors were critically reviewing all proposals for their potential and for allocating them one of the rare open slots in the GSoC program. Finally, on Monday, April 23rd, our 6 finalists have been announced. We are very proud and looking forward to the upcoming months of coding. The following projects have been accepted and will hopefully be realized during the summer.

Our gang of DBpedia mentors comprises of very experienced developers that are working with us on this project for several years now. Speaking of sustainability, we also have former GSoC students on board, who get the chance to mentor projects building on ideas of past GSoC’s. And while students and mentors start bonding, we are really looking forward to the upcoming months of coding – may it be inspiring, fun and fruitful.  

 

DBpedia @ Coding da Vinci 2018

As already mentioned in the previous newsletter, DBpedia is part of the CodingDaVinciOst 2018. Founded in Berlin in 2014, Coding da Vinci is a platform for cultural heritage institutions and the hacker, developer, designer, and gamer community to jointly develop new creative applications from cultural open data during a series of hackathon events. In this year’s edition, DBpedia provides its datasets to support more than 30 cultural institutions, enriching their datasets in order participants of the hackathon can make the most out of the data. Among the participating cultural institutions are, for example, the university libraries of Chemnitz, Jena, Halle, Freiberg, Dresden and Leipzig as well as the Sächsisches Staatsarchiv, Museum für Druckkunst Leipzig, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Duchess Anna Amalia Library, and the Museum Burg Posterstein.

CodingDaVinciOst 2018, the current edition of the hackathon, hosted a kick-off weekend at the Bibliotheca Albertina, the University Library in Leipzig. During the event, DBpedia offered a hands-on workshop for newbies and interested hackathon participants who wanted to learn about how to enrich their project ideas with DBpedia or how to solve potential problems in their projects with DBpedia.

We are now looking forward to the upcoming weeks of coding and hacking and can’t wait to see the results on June 18th, when the final projects will be presented and awarded. We wish all the coders and hackers a pleasant and happy hacking time. Check our DBpedia Twitter for updates and latest news.  

If you have any questions, like to support us in any way or if you like to learn more about DBpedia, just drop us a line via dbpedia@infai.org

Yours,
DBpedia Association

Meeting with the US-DBpedians – A Wrap-Up

One lightning event after the other. Just four weeks after our Amsterdam Community Meeting, we crossed the Atlantic for the third time to meet with over 110 US-based DBpedia enthusiasts. This time, the DBpedia Community met in Cupertino, California and was hosted at Apple Inc. 

Main Event

First and foremost, we would like to thank Apple for the warm welcome and the hosting of the event.

After a Meet & Greet with refreshments, Taylor Rhyne, Eng. Product Manager at Apple, and Pablo N. Mendes, Researcher at Apple and chair of the DBpedia Community Committee, opened the main event with a short introduction setting the tone for the following 2 hours.

The main event attracted attendees with eleven invited talks from major companies of the Bay Area actively using DBpedia or interested in knowledge graphs in general such as Diffbot, IBM, Wikimedia, NTENT, Nuance, Volley and Stardog Union.

Tommaso Soru – University of Leipzig

Tommaso Soru (University of Leipzig), DBpedia mentor in our Google Summer of Code (GSoC) projects, opened the invited talks session with the updates from the DBpedia developer community. This year, DBpedia participated in the GSoC 2017 program with 7 different projects including “First Chatbot for DBpedia”, which was selected as Best DBpedia GSoC Project 2017. His presentation is available here. 

DBpedia likes to thank the following poeple for organizinga nd hosting our Community Meeting in Cupertino, California.

Further Acknowledgments

 

Apple Inc. For sponsoring catering and hosting our meetup on their campus.
Google Summer of Code 2017 Amazing program and the reason some of our core DBpedia devs are visiting California
ALIGNED – Software and Data Engineering For funding the development of DBpedia as a project use-case and covering part of the travel cost
Institute for Applied Informatics For supporting the DBpedia Association
OpenLink Software For continuous hosting of the main DBpedia Endpoint

Invited Talks- A Short Recap

Filipe Mesquita (Diffbot) introduced the new DBpedia NLP Department, born from a recent partnership between our organization and the California based company, which aims at creating the most accurate and comprehensive database of human knowledge. His presentation is available here. Dan Gruhl (IBM Research) held a presentation about the in-house development of an omnilingual ontology and how DBpedia data supported this

Filipe Mesquita – Diffbot

endeavor. Stas Malyshev representative for Dario Taraborelli (both Wikimedia Foundation) presented the current state of the structured data initiatives at Wikidata and the query capabilities for Wikidata. Their slides are available here and here. Ricardo Baeza-Yates (NTENT) gave a short talk on mobile semantic search.

The second part of the event saw Peter F. Patel-Schneider (Nuance) holding a presentation with the title “DBpedia from the Fringe” giving some insights on how DBpedia could be further improved. Shortly after, Sebastian Hellmann, Executive Director of the DBpedia Association, walked the stage and presented the state of the art of the association, including achievements and future goals. Sanjay Krishnan (U.C. Berkeley) talked about the link between AlphaGo and data cleansing. You can find his slides here.  Bill Andersen (Volley.com) argued for the use of extremely precise and fine-grained approaches to deal with small data. His presentation is available here. Finally, Michael Grove (Stardog Union) stressed on the view of knowledge graphs as knowledge toolkits backed by a graph data model.

Michael Grove – Stardog Union

The event concluded with refreshments, snacks and drinks served in the atrium allowing to talk about the presented topics, discuss the latest developments in the field of knowledge graphs and network between all participants. In the end, this closing session was way longer than had been planned.

GSoC Mentor Summit

Shortly after the CA Community Meeting, our DBpedia mentors Tommaso Soru and Magnus Knuth participated at the Google Summer of Code Mentor Summit held in Sunnyvale California. During free sessions hosted by mentors of diverse open source organizations, Tommaso and Magnus presented selected projects during their lightning talks. Beyond open source, open data topics have been targeted in multiple sessions, as this is not only relevant for research, but there is also a strong need in software projects. The meetings paved the way for new collaborations in various areas, e.g. the field of question answering over the DBpedia knowledge corpus, in particular the use of Neural SPARQL Machines for the translation of natural language into structured queries. We expect that this hot deep-learning topic will be featured in the next edition of GSoC projects. Overall, it has been a great experience to meet so many open source fellows from all over the world.

Upcoming events

After the event is before another ….

Connected Data London, November 16th, 2017.

Sebastian Hellmann, executive director of the DBpedia Association will present Data Quality and Data Usage in a large-scale Multilingual Knowledge Graph during the content track at the Connected Data in London. He will also join the panelists in the late afternoon panel discussion about Linked Open Data: Is it failing or just getting out of the blocks? Feel free to join the event and support DBpedia.

A message for all  DBpedia enthusiasts – our next Community Meeting

Currently we are planning our next Community Meeting  and would like to invite DBpedia enthusiasts and chapters who like to host a meeting to send us their ideas to dbpedia@infai.org. The meeting is scheduled for the beginning of 2018. Any suggestions regarding place, time, program and topics are welcome!  

Check our website for further updates, follow us on #twitter or subscribe to our newsletter.

We will keep you posted

Your DBpedia Association

Career Opportunities at DBpedia – A Success Story

Google summer of Code is a global program focused on introducing students to open source software development.

During the 3 months summer break from university, students work on a programming projects  with an open source organization, like DBpedia. 

We are part of this exciting program for more than 5 years now. Many exciting projects developed as results of intense coding during hot summers. Presenting you Wouter Maroy, who has been a GSoC student at GSoc 2016 and who is currently a mentor in this years program, we like to give you a glimpse behind the scenes and show you how important the program is to DBpedia.


Success Story: Wouter Maroy

Who are you?

I’m Wouter Maroy, a 23 years old Master’s student in Computer Science Engineering at Ghent University (Belgium). I’m affiliated with IDLab – imec. Linked Data and Big Data technologies are my two favorite fields of interest. Besides my passion for Computer Science, I like to travel, explore and look for adventures. I’m a student who enjoys his student life in Ghent.  

What is your main interest in DBpedia and what was your motivation to apply for a DBpedia project at GSoC 2016.

I took courses during my Bachelors with lectures about Linked Data and the Semantic Web which of course included DBpedia; it’s an interesting research field. Before my GSoC 2016 application I did some work on Semantic Web technologies and on a technology (RML) that was required for a GSoC 2016 project that was listed by DBpedia. I wanted to get involved in Open Source and DBpedia, so I applied.

What did you do?

DBpedia has used a custom mapping language up until now to generate structured data from raw data from Wikipedia infoboxes. A next step was to improve this process to a more modular and generic approach that leads to higher quality linked data generation . This new approach relied on the integration of RML, the RDF Mapping Language and was the goal of the GSoC 2016 project I applied for. Understanding all the necessary details about the GSoC project required some effort and research before I started with coding. I also had to learn a new programming language (Scala). I had good assistance from my mentors so this turned out very well in the end.  DBpedia’s Extraction Framework, which is used for extracting structured data from Wikipedia, has a quite large codebase. It was the first project of this size I was involved in. I learned a lot from reading its codebase and from contributing by writing code during these months.

Dimitris Kontokostas and Anastasia Dimou were my two mentors. They guided me well throughout the project. I interacted daily with them through Slack and each week we had a conference call to discuss the project.  After many months of research, coding and discussing we managed to deliver a working prototype at the end of the project. The work we did was presented in Leipzig on the DBpedia day during SEMANTICS 16’. Additionally, this work will also be presented at ISWC 2017.

You can check out his project here.

How do you currently contribute to improve DBpedia?  

I’m mentoring a GSoC17 project together with Dimitris Kontokostas and Anastasia Dimou as a follow up on the work that was done by our GSoC 2016 project last year. Ismael Rodriguez is the new student who is participating in the project and he already delivered great work! Besides being a mentor for GSoC 2017, I make sure that the integration of RML into DBpedia is going into the right direction in general (managing, coding,…). For this reason, I worked at the KILT/DBpedia office in Leipzig during summer for 6 weeks. Joining and getting to know the team was a great experience.

What did you gain from the project?

Throughout the project I practiced coding, working in a team, … I learned more about DBpedia, RML, Linked Data and other related technologies. I’m glad I had the opportunity to learn this much from the project. I would recommend it to all students who are curious about DBpedia, who are eager to learn and who want to earn a stipend during summer through coding. You’ll learn a lot and you’ll have a good time!

Final words to future GSoC applicants for DBpedia projects.

Give it a shot! Really, it’s a lot of fun! Coding for DBpedia through GSoC is a great, unique experience and one who is enthusiastic about coding and the DBpedia project should definitely go for it.

Check our website for further updates, follow us on #twitter or subscribe to our newsletter.

Yours

DBpedia Association