Monthly Archives: December 2018

Call for Participation: DBpedia meetup @ XML Prague

We are happy to announce that the upcoming DBpedia meetup will be held in Prague, Czech Republic. During the XML conference Prague , Feb 7-9,  the DBpedia Community will get together on February 7, 2019.

Highlights

– Intro: DBpedia: Global and Unified Access to Knowledge (Graphs)

– DBpedia Databus presentation

– DBpedia Showcase Session

Quick Facts

– Web URL: https://wiki.dbpedia.org/meetings/Prague2019

– When: February 7th, 2019

– Where: University of Economics, nam. W. Churchilla 4, 130 67 Prague 3, Czech Republic

Schedule
Tickets

– Attending the DBpedia Community Meetup costs €40. DBpedia members get free admission, please contact your nearest DBpedia chapter or the DBpedia Association for a promotion code.

– You need to buy a ticket. Please check all details here: http://www.xmlprague.cz/conference-registration/

Sponsors and Acknowledgments

– XML conference Prague (http://www.xmlprague.cz/)

– Institute for Applied Informatics (http://infai.org/en/AboutInfAI)

– OpenLink Software (http://www.openlinksw.com/)

Organisation

-Milan Dojčinovski, AKSW/KILT

– Julia Holze, DBpedia Association

– Sebastian Hellmann, AKSW/KILT, DBpedia Association

– Tomáš Kliegr, KIZI/University of Economics, Prague

 

Tell us what cool things you do with DBpedia. If you would like to give a talk at the DBpedia meetup, please get in contact with the DBpedia Association.

We are looking forward to meeting you in Prague!

For latest news and updates check Twitter, Facebook and our Website or subscribe to our newsletter.

Your DBpedia Association

A year with DBpedia – Retrospective Part 3

This is the final part of our journey around the world with DBpedia. This time we will take you from Austria, to Mountain View, California and to London, UK.

Come on, let’s do this.

Welcome to Vienna, Austria  – Semantics

More than 110 DBpedia enthusiasts joined our Community Meeting in Vienna, on September 10th, 2018. The event was again co-located with SEMANTiCS, a very successful collaboration. Lucky us, we got hold of two brilliant Keynote speakers, to open our meeting. Javier David Fernández García, Vienna University of Economics, opened the meeting with his keynote Linked Open Data cloud – act now before it’s too late. He reflected on challenges towards arriving at a truly machine-readable and decentralized Web of Data. Javier reviewed the current state of affairs, highlighted key technical and non-technical challenges, and outlined potential solution strategies. The second keynote speaker was Mathieu d’Aquin, Professor of Informatics at the Insight Centre for Data Analytics at NUI Galway. Mathieu, who is specialized in data analytics, completed the meeting with his keynote Dealing with Open-Domain Data.

The 12th edition of the DBpedia Community Meeting also covered a special chapter session, chaired by Enno Meijers, from the Dutch DBpedia Language Chapter. The speakers presented the latest technical or organizational developments of their respective chapter. This session has mainly created an exchange platform for the different DBpedia chapters. For the first time, representatives of the European chapters discussed problems and challenges of DBpedia from their point of view. Furthermore, tools, applications, and projects were presented by each chapter’s representative.

In case you missed the event, a more detailed article can be found here. All slides and presentations are also available on our Website. Further insights, feedback, and photos about the event are available on Twitter via #DBpediaDay.

Welcome to Mountain View  – GSoC mentor summit

GSoC was a vital part of DBpedia’s endeavors in 2018. We had three very talented students that with the help of our great mentors made it to the finish line of the program. You can read about their projects and success story in a dedicated post here.

After a successful 3-month mentoring, two of our mentors had the opportunity to attend the annual Google Summer of Code mentor summit. Mariano Rico and Thiago Galery represented DBpedia at the event this year. They engaged in a vital discussion about this years program, about lessons learned, highlights and drawbacks they experienced during the summer. A special focus was put on how to engage potential GSoC students as early as possible to get as much commitment as possible. The ideas the two mentors brought back in their suitcases will help to improve DBpedia’s part of the program for 2019. And apparently, chocolate was a very big thing there ;).

In case you have a project idea for GSoC2019 or want to mentor a DBpedia project next year, just drop us a line via dbpedia@infai.org. Also, as we intend to participate in the upcoming edition, please spread the word amongst students, and especially female students,  that fancy spending their summer coding on a DBpedia project. Thank you.

 

Welcome to London, England – Connected Data London 2018

In early November, we were invited to Connected Data London again. After 2017 this great event seems to become a regular in our DBpedia schedule.

Executive Director of the DBpedia Association, Sebastian Hellmannparticipated as panel candidate in the discussion around “Building Knowledge Graphs in the Real World”. Together with speakers from Thomson Reuters, Zalando, and Textkernel, he discussed definitions of KG, best practices of how to build and use knowledge graphs as well as the recent hype about it.

Visitors of CNDL2018 had the chance to grab a copy of our brand new flyer and exchange with us about the DBpedia Databus. This event gave us the opportunity to already met early adopters of our databus  – a decentralized data publication, integration, and subscription platform. Thank you very much for that opportunity.

A year went by

2018 has gone by so fast and brought so much for DBpedia. The DBpedia Association got the chance to meet more of DBpedia’s language chapters, we developed the DBpedia Databus to an extent that it can finally be launched in spring 2019. DBpedia is a community project relying on people and with the DBpedia Databus, we create a platform that allows publishing and provides a networked data economy around it. So stay tuned for exciting news coming up next year. Until then we like to thank all DBpedia enthusiasts around the world for their research with DBpedia, and support and contributions to DBpedia. Kudos to you.

 

All that remains to say is have yourself a very merry Christmas and a dazzling New Year. May 2019 be peaceful, exciting and prosperous.

 

Yours – being in a cheerful and festive mood –

 

DBpedia Association

 

A year with DBpedia – Retrospective Part Two

Retrospective Part II. Welcome to the second part of our journey around the world with DBpedia. This time we are taking you to Greece, Germany, to Australia and finally France.

Let the travels begin.

Welcome to Thessaloniki, Greece & ESWC

DBpedians from the Portuguese Chapter presented their research results during ESWC 2018 in Thessaloniki, Greece.  the team around Diego Moussalem developed a demo to extend MAG  to support Entity Linking in 40 different languages. A special focus was put on low-resources languages such as Ukrainian, Greek, Hungarian, Croatian, Portuguese, Japanese and Korean. The demo relies on online web services which allow for an easy access to (their) entity linking approaches. Furthermore, it can disambiguate against DBpedia and Wikidata. Currently, MAG is used in diverse projects and has been used largely by the Semantic Web community. Check the demo via http://bit.ly/2RWgQ2M. Further information about the development can be found in a research paper, available here

 

Welcome back to Leipzig Germany

With our new credo “connecting data is about linking people and organizations”, halfway through 2018, we finalized our concept of the DBpedia Databus. This global DBpedia platform aims at sharing the efforts of OKG governance, collaboration, and curation to maximize societal value and develop a linked data economy.

With this new strategy, we wanted to meet some DBpedia enthusiasts of the German DBpedia Community. Fortunately, the LSWT (Leipzig Semantic Web Tag) 2018 hosted in Leipzig, home to the DBpedia Association proofed to be the right opportunity.  It was the perfect platform to exchange with researchers, industry and other organizations about current developments and future application of the DBpedia Databus. Apart from hosting a hands-on DBpedia workshop for newbies we also organized a well-received WebID -Tutorial. Finally,  the event gave us the opportunity to position the new DBpedia Databus as a global open knowledge network that aims at providing unified and global access to knowledge (graphs).

Welcome down under – Melbourne Australia

Further research results that rely on DBpedia were presented during ACL2018, in Melbourne, Australia, July 15th to 20th, 2018. The core of the research was DBpedia data, based on the WebNLG corpus, a challenge where participants automatically converted non-linguistic data from the Semantic Web into a textual format. Later on, the data was used to train a neural network model for generating referring expressions of a given entity. For example, if Jane Doe is a person’s official name, the referring expression of that person would be “Jane”, “Ms Doe”, “J. Doe”, or  “the blonde woman from the USA” etc.

If you want to dig deeper but missed ACL this year, the paper is available here.

 

Welcome to Lyon, France

In July the DBpedia Association travelled to France. With the organizational support of Thomas Riechert (HTWK, InfAI) and Inria, we finally met the French DBpedia Community in person and presented the DBpedia Databus. Additionally, we got to meet the French DBpedia Chapter, researchers and developers around Oscar Rodríguez Rocha and Catherine Faron Zucker.  They presented current research results revolving around an approach to automate the generation of educational quizzes from DBpedia. They wanted to provide a useful tool to be applied in the French educational system, that:

  • helps to test and evaluate the knowledge acquired by learners and…
  • supports lifelong learning on various topics or subjects. 

The French DBpedia team followed a 4-step approach:

  1. Quizzes are first formalized with Semantic Web standards: questions are represented as SPARQL queries and answers as RDF graphs.
  2. Natural language questions, answers and distractors are generated from this formalization.
  3. We defined different strategies to extract multiple choice questions, correct answers and distractors from DBpedia.
  4. We defined a measure of the information content of the elements of an ontology, and of the set of questions contained in a quiz.

Oscar R. Rocha and Catherine F. Zucker also published a paper explaining the detailed approach to automatically generate quizzes from DBpedia according to official French educational standards. 

 

 

Thank you to all DBpedia enthusiasts that we met during our journey. A big thanks to

With this journey from Europe to Australia and back we provided you with insights into research based on DBpedia as well as a glimpse into the French DBpedia Chapter. In our final part of the journey coming up next week, we will take you to Vienna,  San Francisco and London.  In the meantime, stay tuned and visit our Twitter channel or subscribe to our DBpedia Newsletter.

 

Have a great week.

Yours DBpedia Association

A year with DBpedia – A Retrospective Part One

Looking back, 2018 was a very successful year for DBpedia. First and foremost, we refined our strategy and developed our concept of the DBpedia Databus, a central communication system that allows exchanging, curating and accessing data between multiple stakeholders. The Databus simplifies working with data and will be launched in early 2019. 

Moreover, we travelled many miles in 2018 to not only visit our language chapters and exchange about DBpedia but also to meet enthusiast from our community to exchange during workshops and conferences worldwide.

In the upcoming Blog-Series, we like to take you on a retrospective tour around the world, giving you insights into a year with DBpedia. We will start out with Stop-overs in Japan, Poland and Germany and will continue our journey to other continents in the following two weeks.

Sit back and read on.

Big Spring in Japan – Welcome to Myazaki

Welcome to Miyazaki, to LREC, Language Resources and Evaluation Conference 2018 and meet RDF2PT.  No idea what that is and what it has to do with DBpedia? Read on!

The generation of natural language from RDF data has recently gained significant attention due to the continuous growth of Linked Data. Proposing the RDF2PT approach a research team around Diego Moussalem, part of the Portuguese DBpedia Chapter described how RDF data is verbalized to Brazilian Portuguese texts. They highlight the steps taken to generate Portuguese texts and addressed challenges with grammatical gender, classes and resources and properties. The results suggest that RDF2PT generates texts that can be easily understood by humans. It also helps to identify some of the challenges related to the automatic generation of Brazilian Portuguese (especially from RDF).

The full paper is available via https://arxiv.org/pdf/1802.08150.pdf 

 

Welcome to Poznan, Poland

Our community is our asset. In order to grow it and encourage contributions, the DBpedia Association continuously organizes community meetups to tackle the interests of our multi-faceted community. In late May, we travelled to Poland to meet Polish DBpedia enthusiasts in our meetup in Poznań. The idea was, to find out what the Polish DBpedia community uses DBpedia for, what applications and tools they have and what they are currently developing. Members of the chapter presented, amongst others, results of the primary research project “Quality of Data in DBpedia”. Attendees exchanged in vital discussions about uses of DBpedia applications and tools and listened to a presentation of Professor Witold Abramowicz, chair of the Department of Information Systems at Poznan University of Economics and also the head of SmartBrain. He talked about opportunities and challenges of data science.

Further information on the Polish DBpedia Chapter can be found on their website.

Welcome to Leipzig, home to the DBpedia Association

For the first time ever, DBpedia was part of the German culture-hackathon Coding da Vinci, held at Bibliotheca Albertina, University Library of Leipzig University,  in June 2018. In this year’s edition, we not only offered a hands-on workshop but also provided our DBpedia datasets. This data supported more than 30 cultural institutions, enriching their own datasets. In turn, hackathon participants could creatively develop new tools, apps, games quizzes etc. out of the data. 

One of the projects that used DBpedia as a source was Birdory . It is a memory game using bird voices and pictures. The goal is, much like in regular memory games, to match the correct picture to the bird sound that is played. The data used for the game was taken from Museum für Naturkunde Berlin (bird voices) as well as from DBpedia (pictures). So in case you need some me-time during Christmas gatherings, you might want to check it out via: https://birdory.firebaseapp.com/.

 

In our upcoming Blog-Post next week we will take you to Thessaloniki Greece, Australia and again, Leipzig.  In the meantime, stay tuned and visit our Twitter channel or subscribe to our DBpedia Newsletter.  

 

Have a great week,

 

Yours DBpedia Association