Category Archives: DBpedia Application

An application published on wiki.dbpedia.org

Chaudron, chawdron , cauldron and DBpedia

Meet Chaudron

Before getting into the technical details of, did you know the term Chaudron derives from Old French and denotes a large metal cooking pot? The word was used as an alternative form of chawdron which means entrails.  Entrails and cauldron –  a combo that seems quite fitting with Halloween coming along.

And now for something completely different

To begin with, Chaudron is a dataset of more than two million triples. It complements DBpedia with physical measures. The triples are automatically extracted from Wikipedia infoboxes using a pattern-matching and a formal grammar approaches.  This dataset adds triples to the existing DBpedia resources. Additionally, it includes measures on various resources such as chemical elements, railway, people places, aircrafts, dams and many other types of resources.

Chaudron was published on wiki.dbpedia.org and is one of many other projects and applications featuring DBpedia.

Want to find out more about our DBpedia Applications? Why not read about the DBpedia Chatbot, DBpedia Entity or the NLI-Go DBpedia Demo.?

Happy reading & happy Halloween!

Yours DBpedia Association

 

PS: In case you want your DBpedia tool, demo or any kind of application published on our Website and the DBpedia Blog, fill out this form and submit your information.

 

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DBpedia Chapters – Survey Evaluation – Episode Two

Welcome back to part two of the evaluation of the surveys, we conducted with the DBpedia chapters.

Survey Evaluation – Episode Two

The second survey focused on technical matters. We asked the chapters about the usage of DBpedia services and tools, technical problems and challenges and potential reasons to overcome them.  Have a look below.

Again, only nine out of 21 DBpedia chapters participated in this survey. And again, that means, the results only represent roughly 42% of the DBpedia chapter population

The good news is, all chapters maintain a local DBpedia endpoint. Yay! More than 55 % of the chapters perform their own extraction. The rest of them apply a hybrid approach reusing some datasets from DBpedia releases and additionally, extract some on their own.

Datasets, Services and Applications

In terms of frequency of dataset updates, the situation is as follows:  44,4 % of the chapters update them once a year. The answers of the remaining ones differ in equal shares, depending on various factors. See the graph below. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When it comes to the maintenance of links to local datasets, most of the chapters do not have additional ones. However, some do maintain links to, for example, Greek WordNet, the National Library of Greece Authority record, Geonames.jp and the Japanese WordNet. Furthermore, some of the chapters even host other datasets of local interest, but mostly in a separate endpoint, so they keep separate graphs.

Apart from hosting their own endpoint, most chapters maintain one or the other additional service such as Spotlight, LodLive or LodView.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Moreover,  the chapters have additional applications they developed on top of DBpedia data and services.

Besides, they also gave us some reasons why they were not able to deploy DBpedia related services. See their replies below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DBpedia Chapter set-up

Lastly, we asked the technical heads of the chapters what the hardest task for setting up their chapter had been.  The answers, again, vary as the starting position of each chapter differed. Read a few of their replies below.

The hardest technical task for setting up the chapter was:

  • to keep virtuoso up to date
  • the chapter specific setup of DBpedia plugin in Virtuoso
  • the Extraction Framework
  • configuring Virtuoso for serving data using server’s FQDN and Nginx proxying
  • setting up the Extraction Framework, especially for abstracts
  • correctly setting up the extraction process and the DBpedia facet browser
  • fixing internationalization issues, and updating the endpoint
  • keeping the extraction framework working and up to date
  • updating the server to the specific requirements for further compilation – we work on Debian

 

Final  words

With all the data and results we gathered, we will get together with our chapter coordinator to develop a strategy of how to improve technical as well as organizational issues the surveys revealed. By that, we hope to facilitate a better exchange between the chapters and with us, the DBpedia Association. Moreover, we intend to minimize barriers for setting up and maintaining a DBpedia chapter so that our chapter community may thrive and prosper.

In the meantime, spread your work and share it with the community. Do not forget to follow and tag us on Twitter ( @dbpedia ). You may also want to subscribe to our newsletter.

We will keep you posted about any updates and news.

Yours

DBpedia Association

Beta-Test Updates

While everyone at the DBpedia Association was preparing for the SEMANTiCS Conference in Vienna, we also managed to reach an important milestone regarding the beta-test for our data release tool.

First and foremost, already 3500 files have been published with the plugin. These files will be part of the new DBpedia release and are available on our LTS repository.

Secondly, the documentation of the testing has been brought into good shape. Feel free to drop by and check it out.
Thirdly, we reached our first interoperability goal. The current metadata is sufficient to produce RSS 1.0 feeds. See here for further information. We also defined a loose roadmap on top of the readme, where interoperability to DCAT and DCAT-AP has high priority.

 

Now we have some time to support you and work one on one and also prepare the configurations to help you set up the data releases. Lastly, we already received data from DNB and SUMO, so we will start to look into these more closely.

Thanks to all the beta-testers for your nice work.

We keep you posted.

Yours

DBpedia Association

Meet the DBpedia Chatbot

This year’s GSoC is slowly coming to an end with final evaluations already being submitted. In order to bridge the waiting time until final results are published, we like to draw your attention to a former project and great tool that was developed during last years’ GSoC.

Meet the DBpedia Chatbot. 

DBpedia Chatbot is a conversational Chatbot for DBpedia which is accessible through the following platforms:

  1. A Web Interface
  2. Slack
  3. Facebook Messenger

Main Purpose

The bot is capable of responding to users in the form of simple short text messages or through more elaborate interactive messages. Users can communicate or respond to the bot through text and also through interactions (such as clicking on buttons/links). There are 4 main purposes for the bot. They are:

  1. Answering factual questions
  2. Answering questions related to DBpedia
  3. Expose the research work being done in DBpedia as product features
  4. Casual conversation/banter
Question Types

The bot tries to answer text-based questions of the following types:

Natural Language Questions
  1. Give me the capital of Germany
  2. Who is Obama?
Location Information
  1. Where is the Eiffel Tower?
  2. Where is France’s capital?
Service Checks

Users can ask the bot to check if vital DBpedia services are operational.

  1. Is DBpedia down?
  2. Is lookup online?
Language Chapters

Users can ask basic information about specific DBpedia local chapters.

  1. DBpedia Arabic
  2. German DBpedia
Templates

These are predominantly questions related to DBpedia for which the bot provides predefined templatized answers. Some examples include:

  1. What is DBpedia?
  2. How can I contribute?
  3. Where can I find the mapping tool?
Banter

Messages which are casual in nature fall under this category. For example:

  1. Hi
  2. What is your name?

if you like to have a closer look at the internal processes and how the chatbot was developed, check out the DBpedia GitHub pages. 

DBpedia Chatbot was published on wiki.dbpedia.org and is one of many other projects and applications featuring DBpedia.

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In case you want your DBpedia based tool or demo to publish on our website just follow the link and submit your information, we will do the rest.

 

Yours

DBpedia Association

DBpedia Entity – Standard Test Collection for Entity Search over DBpedia

Today we are featuring DBpedia Entity, in our blog series of introducting interesting DBpedia applications and tools to the DBpedia community and beyond. Read on and enjoy.

DBpedia-Entity is a standard test collection for entity search over the DBpedia knowledge base. It is meant for evaluating retrieval systems that return a ranked list of entities (DBpedia URIs) in response to a free text user query.

The first version of the collection (DBpedia-Entity v1) was released in 2013, based on DBpedia v3.7 [1]. It was created by assembling search queries from a number of entity-oriented benchmarking campaigns and mapping relevant results to DBpedia. An updated version of the collection, DBpedia-Entity v2, has been released in 2017, as a result of a collaborative effort between the IAI group of the University of Stavanger, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Wayne State University, and Carnegie Mellon University [2]. It has been published at the 40th International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval (SIGIR’17), where it received a Best Short Paper Honorable Mention Award. See the paper and poster.

DBpedia Entity was published on wiki.dbpedia.org and is one of many other projects and applications featuring DBpedia.

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