Category Archives: Events

Better late than never – GSOC 2019 recap & outlook GSoC 2020

  • Pinky: Gee, Brain, what are we gonna do this year?
  • Brain: The same thing we do every year, Pinky. Taking over GSoC.

And, this is exactly what we did. We had been accepted as one of 206 open source organizations to participate in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) again. More than 25 students followed our call for project ideas. In the end, we chose six amazing students and their project proposals to work with during summer 2019. 
In the following post, we will show you some insights into the project ideas and how they turned out. Additionally, we will shed some light onto our amazing team of mentors who devoted a lot of time and expertise in mentoring our students. 

Meet the students and their projects

A Neural QA Model for DBpedia by Anand Panchbhai

With booming amount of information being continuously added to the internet, organising the facts and serving this information to the users becomes a very difficult task. Currently, DBpedia hosts billions of data points and corresponding relations in the RDF format. Accessing data on DBpedia via a SPARQL query is difficult for amateur users, who do not know how to write a query. This project tried to make this humongous linked data available to a larger user base in their natural languages (now restricted to English). The primary objective of the project was to translate natural language questions to a valid SPARQL query. Click here if you want to check his final code.

Multilingual Neural RDF Verbalizer for DBpedia by Dwaraknath Gnaneshwar

Presently, the generation of Natural Language from RDF data has gained substantial attention and has also been proven to support the creation of Natural Language Generation benchmarks. However, most models are aimed at generating coherent sentences in English, while other languages have enjoyed comparatively less attention from researchers. RDF data is usually in the form of triples, <subject, predicate, object>. Subject denotes the resource, the predicate denotes traits or aspects of the resource and expresses the relationship between subject and object. In this project, we aimed to create a multilingual Neural Verbalizer, ie, generating high-quality natural-language text from sets of RDF triples in multiple languages using one stand-alone, end-to-end trainable model. You can follow up on the progress and outcome of the project here. 

Predicate Detection using Word Embeddings for Question Answering over Linked Data by Yajing Bian

Knowledge-based question-answering system (KBQA) has demonstrated an ability to generate answers to natural language from information stored in a large-scale knowledge base. Generally, it completes the analysis challenge via three steps: identifying named entities, detecting predicates and generate SPARQL queries. In these three steps, predicate detection identifies the KB relation(s) a question refers to. To build a predicate detection structure, we identified all possible named entity first, then collected all predicates corresponding to the above entities. What follows is to calculate the similarity between problem and candidate predicates using a multi-granularity neural network model (MGNN). To find the globally optimal entity-predicate assignment, we use a joint model which is based on the result of entity linking and predicate detection process rather than considering the local predictions (i.e. most possible entity or predicate) as the final result. More details on the project are available here

A tool to generate RDF triples from DBpedia abstract by  Jayakrishna Sahit

The main aim of this project was to research and develop a tool in order to generate highly trustable RDF triples from DBpedia abstracts. In order to develop such a tool, we implemented algorithms which would take the output generated from the syntactic analyzer along with DBpedia spotlight’s named entity identifiers. Further information and the project’s results can be found here

A transformer of Attention Mechanism for Long-context QA by Stuart Chan

In this GSoC project, I choose to employ the language model of the transformer with an attention mechanism to automatically discover query templates for the neural question-answering knowledge-based model. The ultimate goal was to train the attention-based NSpM model on DBpedia with its evaluation against the QALD benchmark. Check here for more details on the project.

Workflow for linking External datasets by Jaydeep Chakraborty

The requirement of the project was to create a workflow for entity linking between DBpedia and external data sets. We aimed at an approach for ontology alignment through the use of an unsupervised mixed neural network. We explored reading and parsing the ontology and extracted all necessary information about concepts and instances. Additionally, we generated semantic vectors for each entity with different meta information like entity hierarchy, object property, data property, and restrictions and designed a User Interface based system which showed all necessary information about the workflow. Further info, download details and project results are available here

Meet our Mentors

First of all, a big shout out and thank you to all mentors and co-mentors who helped our students to succeed in their endeavours.

  • Aman Mehta, former GSoC student and current junior mentor, recently interned as a software engineer at Facebook, London.
  • Beyza Yaman, a senior mentor and organizational admin, Post-Doctoral Researcher based in ADAPT, Dublin City University, former Springer Nature-DBpedia intern and former research associate at the InfAI/University of Leipzig. She is responsible for the Turkish DBpedia and her field of interests are information retrieval, data extraction and integration over Linked Data.
  • Tommaso Soru, senior mentor and organizational admin. I’m a Machine Learning & AI enthusiast, Data Scientist at Data Lens Ltd in London and a PhD candidate at the University of Leipzig. 

“DBpedia is my window to the world of semantic data, not only for its intuitive interface but also because its knowledge is organised in a simple and uncomplicated way”

Tommaso Soru, GSoC 2019
  • Amandeep Srivastava, Junior Mentor and analyst at Goldman Sachs. He’s a huge fan of Christopher Nolan and likes to read fiction books in his free time.
  • Diego Moussalem, Senior mentor, Senior Researcher at Paderborn University, an active and vital member of the Portuguese DBpedia Chapter
  • Luca Virgili, currently a Computer Science PhD student at the Polytechnic University of Marche.He was a GSoC student for a year and a GSoC mentor for 2 years in DBpedia. 
  • Bharat Suri, former GSOC student, Junior Mentor, Masters degree in Computer Science at The Ohio State University

“I have thoroughly enjoyed both my years of GSoC with DBpedia and I plan to stay and help out in whichever way I can”

Bharat Suri, GSoC 2019
  • Mariano Rico, senior mentor,  Senior Doctor Researcher at Ontology Engineering Group, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid.
  • Nausheen Fatma, senior mentor, Data Scientist, Natural Language Processing, Machine Learning at Info Edge (naukri.com).
  • Ram G Athreya long-term GSoC mentor, Research Engineer at Viv Labs, Bay Area, San Francisco. 
  • Ricardo Usbeck, team leader ‘Conversational AI and Knowledge Graphs’ at Fraunhofer IAIS.
  • Rricha Jalota, former GSoC students, current senior mentor, developer in the Data Science Group at University of Paderborn, Germany 

“The reason why I love collaborating with DBpedia (apart from the fact that, it’s a powerhouse of knowledge-driven applications) is not only it gave me my first big break to the amazing field of NLP but also to the world of open-source!”

Rricha Jalota, GSoC 2019

In addition, we also like to thank the rest of our mentor team namely, Thiago Castro Ferreira, Aashay Singhal and Krishanu Konar, former GSoC student and current senior mentor, for their great work.  

Mentor Summit Recap 

This GSoC marked the 15th consecutive year of the program and was the 8th season in a row for DBpedia. As usual in each year we had two of our mentors, Rricha Jalota and Aashay Singhal joining the annual GSoC mentor summit. Selected mentors get the chance to meet each other and engage in a vital knowledge and expertise exchange around various GSoC related and non-related topics. Apart from more entertaining activities such as games, a scavenger hunt and a guided trip through Munich mentors also discussed pressing questions such as “why is it important to fail your students” or “how can we have our GSoC students stay and contribute for long”.

After GSoC is before the next GSoC

If you are interested in either mentoring a DBpedia GSoC project or if you want to contribute to a project of your own we are happy to have you on board. There are a few things to get you started.

Likewise, if you are an ambitious student who is interested in open source development and working with DBpedia you are more than welcome to either contribute your own project idea or apply for project ideas we offer starting in early 2020.

Stay tuned, frequently check Twitter or the DBpedia Forum to stay in touch and don’t miss your chance of becoming a crucial force in this endeavour as well as a vital member of the DBpedia community.

See you soon,

yours

DBpedia Association

More than 50 DBpedia enthusiasts joined the Community Meeting in Karlsruhe.

SEMANTiCS is THE leading European conference in the field of semantic technologies and the platform for professionals who make semantic computing work, and understand its benefits and know its limitations.

Since we at DBpedia have a long-standing partnership with Semantics we also joined this year’s event in Karlsruhe. September 12, the last day of the conference was dedicated to the DBpedia community. 

First and foremost, we would like to thank the Institute for Applied Informatics for supporting our community and many thanks to FIZ Karlsruhe for hosting our community meeting.

Following, we will give you a brief retrospective about the presentations.

Opening Session

Katja Hose – “Querying the web of data”

….on the search for the killer App.

The concept of Linked Open Data and the promise of the Web of Data have been around for over a decade now. Yet, the great potential of free access to a broad range of data that these technologies offer has not yet been fully exploited. This talk will, therefore review the current state of the art, highlight the main challenges from a query processing perspective, and sketch potential ways on how to solve them. Slides are available here.

Dan Weitzner – “timbr-DBpedia – Exploration and Query of DBpedia in SQL

The timbr SQL Semantic Knowledge Platform enables the creation of virtual knowledge graphs in SQL. The DBpedia version of timbr supports query of DBpedia in SQL and seamless integration of DBpedia data into data warehouses and data lakes. We already published a detailed blogpost about timbr where you can find all relevant information about this amazing new DBpedia Service.

Showcase Session

Maribel Acosta“A closer look at the changing dynamics of DBpedia mappings”

Her presentation looked at the mappings wiki and how different language chapters use and edit it. Slides are available here.

Mariano Rico“Polishing a diamond: techniques and results to enhance the quality of DBpedia data”

DBpedia is more than a source for creating papers. It is also being used by companies as a remarkable data source. This talk is focused on how we can detect errors and how to improve the data, from the perspective of academic researchers and but also on private companies. We show the case for the Spanish DBpedia (the second DBpedia in size after the English chapter) through a set of techniques, paying attention to results and further work. Slides are available here.

Guillermo Vega-Gorgojo – “Clover Quiz: exploiting DBpedia to create a mobile trivia game”

Clover Quiz is a turn-based multiplayer trivia game for Android devices with more than 200K multiple choice questions (in English and Spanish) about different domains generated out of DBpedia. Questions are created off-line through a data extraction pipeline and a versatile template-based mechanism. A back-end server manages the question set and the associated images, while a mobile app has been developed and released in Google Play. The game is available free of charge and has been downloaded by +10K users, answering more than 1M questions. Therefore, Clover Quiz demonstrates the advantages of semantic technologies for collecting data and automating the generation of multiple-choice questions in a scalable way. Slides are available here.

Fabian Hoppe and Tabea Tiez – “The Return of German DBpedia”

Fabian and Tabea will present the latest news on the German DBpedia chapter as it returns to the language chapter family after an extended offline period. They will talk about the data set, discuss a few challenges along the way and give insights into future perspectives of the German chapter. Slides are available here.

Wlodzimierz Lewoniewski and Krzysztof Węcel  – “References extraction from Wikipedia infoboxes”

In Wikipedia’s infoboxes, some facts have references, which can be useful for checking the reliability of the provided data. We present challenges and methods connected with the metadata extraction of Wikipedia’s sources. We used DBpedia Extraction Framework along with own extensions in Python to provide statistics about citations in 10 language versions. Provided methods can be used to verify and synchronize facts depending on the quality assessment of sources. Slides are available here.

Wlodzimierz Lewoniewski – “References extraction from Wikipedia infoboxes” … He gave insight into the process of extracting references for Wikipedia infoboxes, which we will use in our GFS project.

Afternoon Session

Sebastian Hellmann, Johannes Frey, Marvin Hofer – “The DBpedia Databus – How to build a DBpedia for each of your Use Cases”

The DBpedia Databus is a platform that is intended for data consumers. It will enable users to build an automated DBpedia-style Knowledge Graph for any data they need. The big benefit is that users not only have access to data, but are also encouraged to apply improvements and, therefore, will enhance the data source and benefit other consumers. We want to use this session to officially introduce the Databus, which is currently in beta and demonstrate its power as a central platform that captures decentrally created client-side value by consumers.  

We will give insight on how the new monthly DBpedia releases are built and validated to copy and adapt for your use cases. Slides are available here.

Interactive session, moderator: Sebastian Hellmann – “DBpedia Connect & DBpedia Commerce – Discussing the new Strategy of DBpedia”

In order to keep growing and improving, DBpedia has been undergoing a growth hack for the last couple of months. As part of this process, we developed two new subdivisions of DBpedia: DBpedia Connect and DBpedia Commerce. The former is a low-code platform to interconnect your public or private databus data with the unified, global DBpedia graph and export the interconnected and enriched knowledge graph into your infrastructure. DBpedia Commerce is an access and payment platform to transform Linked Data into a networked data economy. It will allow DBpedia to offer any data, mod, application or service on the market. During this session, we will provide more insight into these as well as an overview of how DBpedia users can best utilize them. Slides are available here.

In case you missed the event, all slides and presentations are also available on our Website. Further insights, feedback and photos about the event are available on Twitter via #DBpediaDay

We are now looking forward to more DBpedia meetings next year. So, stay tuned and check Twitter, Facebook and the Website or subscribe to our Newsletter for the latest news and information.

If you want to organize a DBpedia Community meeting yourself, just get in touch with us via dbpedia@infai.org regarding program and organization.

Yours

DBpedia Association

SEMANTiCS 2019 Interview: Katja Hose

Today’s post features an interview with our DBpedia Day keynote speaker Katja Hose, a Professor of Computer Science at Aalborg University, Denmark. In this Interview, Katja talks about increasing the reliability of Knowledge Graph Access as well as her expectations for SEMANTiCS 2019

Prior to joining Aalborg University, Katja was a postdoc at the Max Planck Institute for Informatics in Saarbrücken. She received her doctoral degree in Computer Science from Ilmenau University of Technology in Germany.

Can you tell us something about your research focus?

The most important focus of my research has been querying the Web of Data, in particular, efficient query processing over distributed knowledge graphs and Linked Data. This includes indexing, source selection, and efficient query execution. Unfortunately, it happens all too often that the services needed to access remote knowledge graphs are temporarily not available, for instance, because a software component crashed. Hence, we are currently developing a decentralized architecture for knowledge sharing that will make access to knowledge graphs a reliable service, which I believe is the key to a wider acceptance and usage of this technology.

How do you personally contribute to the advancement of semantic technologies?

I contribute by doing research, advancing the state of the art, and applying semantic technologies to practical use cases.  The most important achievements so far have been our works on indexing and federated query processing, and we have only recently published our first work on a decentralized architecture for sharing and querying semantic data. I have also been using semantic technologies in other contexts, such as data warehousing, fact-checking, sustainability assessment, and rule mining over knowledge bases.

Overall, I believe the greatest ideas and advancements come when trying to apply semantic technologies to real-world use cases and problems, and that is what I will keep on doing.

Which trends and challenges do you see for linked data and the semantic web?

The goal and the idea behind Linked Data and the Semantic Web is the second-best invention after the Internet. But unlike the Internet, Linked Data and the Semantic Web are only slowly being adopted by a broader community and by industry.

I think part of the reason is that from a company’s point of view, there are not many incentives and added benefit of broadly sharing the achievements. Some companies are simply reluctant to openly share their results and experiences in the hope of retaining an advantage over their competitors. I believe that if these success stories were shared more openly, and this is the trend we are witnessing right now, more companies will see the potential for their own problems and find new exciting use cases.

Another particular challenge, which we will have to overcome, is that it is currently still far too difficult to obtain and maintain an overview of what data is available and formulate a query as a non-expert in SPARQL and the particular domain… and of course, there is the challenge that accessing these datasets is not always reliable.

As artificial intelligence becomes more and more important, what is your vision of AI?

AI and machine learning are indeed becoming more and more important. I do believe that these technologies will bring us a huge step ahead. The process has already begun. But we also need to be aware that we are currently in the middle of a big hype where everybody wants to use AI and machine learning – although many people actually do not truly understand what it is and if it is actually the best solution to their problems. It reminds me a bit of the old saying “if the only tool you have is a hammer, then every problem looks like a nail”. Only time will tell us which problems truly require machine learning, and I am very curious to find out which solutions will prevail.

However, the current state of the art is still very far away from the AI systems that we all know from Science Fiction. Existing systems operate like black boxes on well-defined problems and lack true intelligence and understanding of the meaning of the data. I believe that the key to making these systems trustworthy and truly intelligent will be their ability to explain their decisions and their interpretation of the data in a transparent way.

What are your expectations about Semantics 2019 in Karlsruhe?

First and foremost, I am looking forward to meeting a broad range of people interested in semantic technologies. In particular, I would like to get in touch with industry-based research and to be exposed 

The End

We like to thank Katje Hose for her insights and are happy to have her as one of our keynote speakers.

Visit SEMANTiCS 2019 in Karlsruhe, Sep 9-12 and get your tickets for our community meeting here. We are looking forward to meeting you during DBpedia Day.

Yours DBpedia Association

SEMANTiCS Interview: Dan Weitzner

As the upcoming 14th DBpedia Community Meeting, co-located with SEMANTiCS 2019 in Karlsruhe, Sep 9-12, is drawing nearer, we like to take that opportunity to introduce you to our DBpedia keynote speakers.

Today’s post features an interview with Dan Weitzner from WPSemantix who talks about timbr-DBpedia, which we blogged about recently, as well as future trends and challenges of linked data and the semantic web.

Dan Weitzner is co-founder and Vice President of Research and Development of WPSemantix. He obtained his Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from Florida Atlantic University. In collaboration with DBpedia, he and his colleagues at WPSemantix launched timbr, the first SQL Semantic Knowledge Graph that integrates Wikipedia and Wikidata Knowledge into SQL engines.

Dan Weitzner

1. Can you tell us something about your research focus?

WPSemantix bridges the worlds of standard databases and the Semantic Web by creating ontologies accessible in standard SQL. 

Our platform – timbr is a virtual knowledge graph that maps existing data-sources to abstract concepts, accessible directly in all the popular Business Intelligence (BI) tools and also natively integrated into Apache Spark, R, Python, Java and Scala. 

timbr enables reasoning and inference for complex analytics without the need for costly Extract-Transform-Load (ETL) processes to graph databases.

2. How do you personally contribute to the advancement of semantic technologies?

We believe we have lowered the fundamental barriers to adoption of semantic technologies for large organizations who want to benefit from knowledge graph capabilities without firstly requiring fundamental changes in their database infrastructure and secondly, without requiring expensive organizational changes or significant personnel retraining.  

Additionally, we implemented the W3C Semantic Web principles to enable inference and inheritance between concepts in SQL, and to allow seamless integration of existing ontologies from OWL. Subsequently, users across organizations can do complex analytics using the same tools that they currently use to access and query their databases, and in addition, to facilitate the sophisticated query of big data without requiring highly technical expertise.  
timbr-DBpedia is one example of what can be achieved with our technology. This joint effort with the DBpedia Association allows semantic SQL query of the DBpedia knowledge graph, and the semantic integration of the DBpedia knowledge into data warehouses and data lakes. Finally, timbr-DBpedia allows organizations to benefit from enriching their data with DBpedia knowledge, combining it with machine learning and/or accessing it directly from their favourite BI tools.

3. Which trends and challenges do you see for linked data and the semantic web?

Currently, the use of semantic technologies for data exploration and data integration is a significant trend followed by data-driven communities. It allows companies to leverage the relationship-rich data to find meaningful insights into their data. 

One of the big difficulties for the average developer and business intelligence analyst is the challenge to learn semantic technologies. Another one is to create ontologies that are flexible and easily maintained. We aim to solve both challenges with timbr.

4. Which application areas for semantic technologies do you perceive as most promising?

I think semantic technologies will bloom in applications that require data integration and contextualization for machine learning models.

Ontology-based integration seems very promising by enabling accurate interpretation of data from multiple sources through the explicit definition of terms and relationships – particularly in big data systems,  where ontologies could bring consistency, expressivity and abstraction capabilities to the massive volumes of data.

5. As artificial intelligence becomes more and more important, what is your vision of AI?

I envision knowledge-based business intelligence and contextualized machine learning models. This will be the bedrock of cognitive computing as any analysis will be semantically enriched with human knowledge and statistical models.

This will bring analysts and data scientists to the next level of AI.

6. What are your expectations about Semantics 2019 in Karlsruhe?

I want to share our vision with the semantic community and I would also like to learn about the challenges, vision and expectations of companies and organizations dealing with semantic technologies. I will present “timbr-DBpedia – Exploration and Query of DBpedia in SQL”

The End

Visit SEMANTiCS 2019 in Karlsruhe, Sep 9-12 and find out more about timbr-DBpedia and all the other new developments at DBpedia. Get your tickets for our community meeting here. We are looking forward to meeting you during DBpedia Day.

Yours DBpedia Association

Home Sweet Home – The 13th DBpedia Community Meeting

For the second time now, we co-located one of our DBpedia community meetings with the LDK-conference. After the previous edition in Galway two years ago, It was Leipzig’s turn to host the event. Thus, the 13th DBpedia community meeting took place in this beautiful city which is also home to the DBpedia Association’s head office. Win, Win we’d say. 

After a very successful LDK conference May 20th-21st, representatives of the European DBpedia community met at Villa Ida Mediencampus,  on Thursday, May 23rd, to present their work with DBpedia and to exchange about the DBpedia Databus.  

For those of you who missed it or for those who want a little retrospective on the day, this blog post provides you with a short LDK-wrap-up as well as a recap of our DBpedia Day.

First things first

First and foremost, we would like to thank LDK organizers for co-locating our meeting and thus enabling fruitful synergies, and a platform for the DBpedia community to exchange.

LDK

The first presentation that kicked-off the conference was given by Prof. Christiane Fellbaum from Princeton University. The topic of her talk was on “Mapping the Lexicons of Signs and Words” with the main focus on her research of mapping WordNet and SignStudy, a resource for American Sign Language. Shortly after, Prof Eduard Werner from Leipzig University gave a very exciting talk on the “Sorbian languages”. He discussed the nature of the Sorbian languages, their historical background, and the unfortunate imminent extinction of lower Sorbian due to a decline of native speakers.

The first day of LDK was full of exciting presentations related to various language-oriented topics. Researchers exchanged about linguistic vocabularies, SPARQL query recommendations, role and reference grammar, language detection, entity recognition, machine translation, under-resourced languages, metaphor identification, event detection and linked data in general. The first day ended with fruitful discussions during the poster session. After at the end of the first conference day, LDK visitors had the chance to mingle with locals in some of Leipzig’s most exciting bars during a pub crawl.

Prof. Christian Bizer from the University of Mannheim opened the second day with a keynote on “Schema.org Annotations and Web Tables: Underexploited Semantic Nuggets on the Web?”. In his talk, he gave a nice overview of the research on knowledge extraction around the large-scale Web Data Commons corpus, findings, open challenges and possible exploitations of this corpus.

The second day was busy with four sessions, each populated with presentations on exciting topics ranging from relation classification, dictionary linking and entity linking, to terminology models, topical thesauri and morphology.

The series of presentations was ended with an Organ Prelude played by David Timm, the University Music Director at the Leipzig University. Finally, the day and the conference was concluded with a conference dinner at Moritzbastei, one of Leipzig’s famous cultural centres.

DBpedia Day

On May 23rd, the DBpedia Community met for the 13th DBpedia community meeting. The event attracted more than 60 participants who extended their LDK experience or followed our call to Leipzig.

Opening & keynotes

The meeting was opened by Dr. Sebastian Hellmann, the executive director of the DBpedia Association. He gave an overview of the latest developments and achievements around DBpedia, with the main focus on the DBpedia Databus technologies. The first keynote was given by Dr. Peter Haase, from metaphacts, with an unusual interactive presentation on “Linked Data Fun with DBpedia”. The second keynote speaker was Prof. Heiko Paulheim, presenting findings, challenges and results from his work on the construction of the DBkWiki Knowledge Graph by exploiting the DBpedia extraction framework.

Showcase session

The showcases session started with a presentation given by  Krzysztof Węcel on “Citations and references in DBpedia”, followed by Peter Nancke with a presentation on the “TeBaQA Question Answering System”, Maribel Acosta Deibe speaking about “Crowdsourcing the Quality of DBpedia” and finally, a presentation by Angus Addlesee on “Data Reconciliation using DBpedia”.

NLP & DBpedia session

The DBpedia & NLP session was opened by  Diego Moussallem presenting the results from his work on “Generating Natural Language from RDF Data”. The second presentation was given by Christian Jilek on the topic of “Named Entity Recognition for Real-Time Applications”, which at the same time won the best research paper at the LDK conference. Next, Jonathan Kobbe presented the best student paper at the LDK conference on the topic of “Argumentative Relation Classification”. Finally, Edgard Marx closed the session with an overview presentation on “From the word to the resource”.

 

Side-Event – Hackathon

The “Artificial Intelligence for Smart Agriculture” Hackathon focused on enhancing the usability of automatic analysis tools which utilize semantic big data for agriculture, as well as conducting an outreach of the DataBio project for the DBpedia community. The event was supported by PNO, Spacebel, PSNC, and InfAI e.V.

We improved the visualization module of Albatross, a platform for processing and analyzing Linked Open Data, and added functionalities to geo-L, the geospatial link discovery tool.  

In addition, we presented a paper about Linked Data publication pipelines, focusing on agri-related data, at the co-located LSWT conference.

Wrap Up

After the event, DBpedians joined the DBpedia Association in the nearby pub Gosenschenke to delve into more vital talks about the Semantic Web world, Linked Data & DBpedia.

In case you missed the event, all slides and presentations are available on our website. Further insights feedback and photos about the event can be found on Twitter via #DBpediaLeipzig.

We are currently looking forward to the next DBpedia Community Meeting, on Sept, 12th in Karlsruhe, Germany. This meeting is co-located with the SEMANTiCS Conference. Contributions are still welcome. Just ping us via dbpedia@infai.org and show us what you’ve got. You should also get in touch with us if you want to host a DBpedia Meetup yourself. We will help you with the program, the dissemination or organizational matters of the event if need be.

Stay tuned, check Twitter, Facebook, and the website, or subscribe to our newsletter for the latest news and updates.

 

Your DBpedia Association

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and DBpedia

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is currently the central subject of the just announced ‘Year of Science’  by the Federal German Ministry. In recent years, new approaches were explored on how to facilitate AI, new mindsets were established and new tools were developed, new technologies implemented. AI is THE key technology of the 21st century. Together with Machine Learning (ML), it transforms society faster than ever before and, will lead humankind to its digital future.

In this digital transformation era, success will be based on using analytics to discover the insights locked in the massive volume of data being generated today. Success with AI and ML depends on having the right infrastructure to process the data.[1]

The Value of Data Governance

One key element to facilitate ML and AI for the digital future of Europe, are ‘decentralized semantic data flows’, as stated by Sören Auer, a founding member of DBpedia and current director at TIB, during a meeting about the digital future in Germany at the Bundestag. He further commented that major AI breakthroughs were indeed facilitated by easily accessible datasets, whereas the Algorithms used were comparatively old.

In conclusion, Auer reasons that the actual value lies in data governance. Infact, in order to guarantee progress in  AI, the development of a common and transparent understanding of data is necessary. [2]

DBpedia Databus – Digital Factory Platform

The DBpedia Databus  – our digital factory Platform –  is one of many drivers that will help to build the much-needed data infrastructure for ML and AI to prosper.  With the DBpedia Databus, we create a hub that facilitates a ‘networked data-economy’ revolving around the publication of data. Upholding the motto, Unified and Global Access to Knowledge, the databus facilitates exchanging, curating and accessing data between multiple stakeholders  – always, anywhere. Publishing data on the Databus means connecting and comparing (your) data to the network. Check our current DBpedia releases via http://downloads.dbpedia.org/repo/dev/.

DBpediaDay – & AI for Smart Agriculture

Furthermore, you can learn about the DBpedia Databus during our 13th DBpedia Community meeting, co-located with LDK conference,  in Leipzig, May 2019. Additionally, as a special treat for you, we also offer an AI side-event on May 23rd, 2019.

May we present you the thinktank and hackathon  – “Artificial Intelligence for Smart Agriculture”. The goal of this event is to develop new ideas and small tools which can demonstrate the use of AI in the agricultural domain or the use of AI for a sustainable bio-economy. In that regard, a special focus will be on the use and the impact of linked data for AI components. 

In short, the two-part event, co-located with LSWT & DBpediaDay, comprises workshops, on-site team hacking as well as presentations of results. The activity is supported by the projects DataBio and Bridge2Era as well as CIAOTECH/PNO. All participating teams are invited to join and present their projects. Further Information are available here. Please submit your ideas and projects here.  

 

Finally, the DBpedia Association is looking forward to meeting you in Leipzig, home of our head office. Pay us a visit!

____

Resources:

[1] Zeus Kerravala; The Success of ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND MACHINE LEARNING Requires an Architectural Approach to Infrastructure. ZK Research: A Division of Kerravala Consulting © 2018 ZK Research, available via http://bit.ly/2UwTJRo

[2] Sören Auer; Statement at the Bundestag during a meeting in AI, Summary is available via https://www.tib.eu/de/service/aktuelles/detail/tib-direktor-als-experte-zu-kuenstlicher-intelligenz-ki-im-deutschen-bundestag/

Call for Participation – LDK Conference & DBpedia Day

Call for Participation LDK – Conference

With the advent of digital technologies, an ever-increasing amount of language data is now available across various application areas and industry sectors, thus making language data more and more valuable. In that context, we would like to draw your attention to the 2nd Language, Data and Knowledge conference, short LDK conference which will be held in Leipzig from May 20th till 22nd, 2019.

The Conference

This new biennial conference series aims at bringing together researchers from across disciplines concerned with language data in data science and knowledge-based applications.

Keynote Speakers

We are happy, that Christian Bizer, a founding member of DBpedia, will be one of the three amazing keynote speakers that open the LDK conference. Apart from Christian, Christiane Fellbaum from Princeton University and  Eduart Werner, representative of Leipzig University will share their thoughts on current language data issues to start vital discussions revolving around language data.

Be part of this event in Leipzig and catch up with the latest research outcomes in the areas of acquisition, provenance, representation, maintenance, usability, quality as well as legal, organizational and infrastructure aspects of language data.  

DBpedia Community Meeting

To get the full Leipzig experience, we also like to invite you to our DBpedia Community meeting, which is colocated with LDK and will be held on May, 23rd 2019. Contributions are still welcome. Just in get in touch via dbpedia@infai.org .

We also offer an interesting side-event, the Thinktank and Hackathon “Artificial Intelligence for Smart Agriculture”. Visit our website for further information.

Join LDK conference 2019 and our DBpedia Community Meeting to catch up with the latest research and developments in the Semantic Web Community. 

 

Yours DBpedia Association

Vítejte v Praze!

After our meetups in Poland and France last year, we delighted the Czech DBpedia community with a DBpedia meetup. It was co-located with the XML Prague conference on February 7th, 2019.

First and foremost, we would like to thank Jirka Kosek (University of Economics, Prague), Milan Dojchinovski (AKSW/KILT, Czech Technical University in Prague), Tomáš Kliegr (KIZI/University of Economics, Prague) and, the XML Prague conference for co-hosting and support the event.

Opening the DBpedia community meetup

The Czech DBpedia community and the DBpedia Databus were in the focus of this meetup. Therefore, we invited local data scientists as well as DBpedia enthusiasts to discuss the state-of-the-art of the DBpedia databus. Sebastian Hellmann (AKSW/KILT) opened the meeting with an introduction to DBpedia and the DBpedia Databus. Following, Marvin Hofer explained how to use the DBpedia databus in combination with the Docker technology and, Johannes Frey (AKSW/KILT) presented the methods behind the DBpedia’s Data Fusion and Global ID Management.

Showcase Session

Marek Dudáš (KIZI/UEP) started the DBpedia Showcase Session with a presentation on “Concept Maps with the help of DBpedia”, where he showed the audience how to create a “concept map” with the ContextMinds application. Furthermore, Tomáš Kliegr (KIZI/UEP) presented “Explainable Machine Learning and Knowledge Graphs”. He explained his contribution to a rule-based classifier for business use cases. Two other showcases followed: Václav Zeman (KIZI/UEP), who presented “RdfRules: Rule Mining from DBpedia” and Denis Streitmatter (AKSW/KILT), who demonstrated the “DBpedia API”.

Miroslav Blasko presents “Ontology-based Dataset Exploration”

Closing this Session, Miroslav Blasko (CTU, Prague) gave a presentation on “Ontology-based Dataset Exploration”. He explained a taxonomy developed for dataset description. Additionally, he presented several use cases that have the main goal of improving content-based descriptors.

Summing up, the DBpedia meetup in Prague brought together more than 50 DBpedia enthusiasts from all over Europe. They engaged in vital discussions about Linked Data, the DBpedia databus, as well as DBpedia use cases and services.

 

 

 

In case you missed the event, all slides and presentations are available on our website. Further insights  feedback, and photos about the event can be found on Twitter via #DBpediaPrague.

We are currently looking forward to the next DBpedia Community Meeting, on May 23rd, 2019 in Leipzig, Germany. This meeting is co-located with the Language, Data and Knowledge (LDK) conference. Stay tuned and check Twitter, Facebook and the website or subscribe to our newsletter for the latest news and updates.

Your DBpedia Association

Call for Participation: DBpedia meetup @ XML Prague

We are happy to announce that the upcoming DBpedia meetup will be held in Prague, Czech Republic. During the XML conference Prague , Feb 7-9,  the DBpedia Community will get together on February 7, 2019.

Highlights

– Intro: DBpedia: Global and Unified Access to Knowledge (Graphs)

– DBpedia Databus presentation

– DBpedia Showcase Session

Quick Facts

– Web URL: https://wiki.dbpedia.org/meetings/Prague2019

– When: February 7th, 2019

– Where: University of Economics, nam. W. Churchilla 4, 130 67 Prague 3, Czech Republic

Schedule
Tickets

– Attending the DBpedia Community Meetup costs €40. DBpedia members get free admission, please contact your nearest DBpedia chapter or the DBpedia Association for a promotion code.

– You need to buy a ticket. Please check all details here: http://www.xmlprague.cz/conference-registration/

Sponsors and Acknowledgments

– XML conference Prague (http://www.xmlprague.cz/)

– Institute for Applied Informatics (http://infai.org/en/AboutInfAI)

– OpenLink Software (http://www.openlinksw.com/)

Organisation

-Milan Dojčinovski, AKSW/KILT

– Julia Holze, DBpedia Association

– Sebastian Hellmann, AKSW/KILT, DBpedia Association

– Tomáš Kliegr, KIZI/University of Economics, Prague

 

Tell us what cool things you do with DBpedia. If you would like to give a talk at the DBpedia meetup, please get in contact with the DBpedia Association.

We are looking forward to meeting you in Prague!

For latest news and updates check Twitter, Facebook and our Website or subscribe to our newsletter.

Your DBpedia Association

A year with DBpedia – Retrospective Part 3

This is the final part of our journey around the world with DBpedia. This time we will take you from Austria, to Mountain View, California and to London, UK.

Come on, let’s do this.

Welcome to Vienna, Austria  – Semantics

More than 110 DBpedia enthusiasts joined our Community Meeting in Vienna, on September 10th, 2018. The event was again co-located with SEMANTiCS, a very successful collaboration. Lucky us, we got hold of two brilliant Keynote speakers, to open our meeting. Javier David Fernández García, Vienna University of Economics, opened the meeting with his keynote Linked Open Data cloud – act now before it’s too late. He reflected on challenges towards arriving at a truly machine-readable and decentralized Web of Data. Javier reviewed the current state of affairs, highlighted key technical and non-technical challenges, and outlined potential solution strategies. The second keynote speaker was Mathieu d’Aquin, Professor of Informatics at the Insight Centre for Data Analytics at NUI Galway. Mathieu, who is specialized in data analytics, completed the meeting with his keynote Dealing with Open-Domain Data.

The 12th edition of the DBpedia Community Meeting also covered a special chapter session, chaired by Enno Meijers, from the Dutch DBpedia Language Chapter. The speakers presented the latest technical or organizational developments of their respective chapter. This session has mainly created an exchange platform for the different DBpedia chapters. For the first time, representatives of the European chapters discussed problems and challenges of DBpedia from their point of view. Furthermore, tools, applications, and projects were presented by each chapter’s representative.

In case you missed the event, a more detailed article can be found here. All slides and presentations are also available on our Website. Further insights, feedback, and photos about the event are available on Twitter via #DBpediaDay.

Welcome to Mountain View  – GSoC mentor summit

GSoC was a vital part of DBpedia’s endeavors in 2018. We had three very talented students that with the help of our great mentors made it to the finish line of the program. You can read about their projects and success story in a dedicated post here.

After a successful 3-month mentoring, two of our mentors had the opportunity to attend the annual Google Summer of Code mentor summit. Mariano Rico and Thiago Galery represented DBpedia at the event this year. They engaged in a vital discussion about this years program, about lessons learned, highlights and drawbacks they experienced during the summer. A special focus was put on how to engage potential GSoC students as early as possible to get as much commitment as possible. The ideas the two mentors brought back in their suitcases will help to improve DBpedia’s part of the program for 2019. And apparently, chocolate was a very big thing there ;).

In case you have a project idea for GSoC2019 or want to mentor a DBpedia project next year, just drop us a line via dbpedia@infai.org. Also, as we intend to participate in the upcoming edition, please spread the word amongst students, and especially female students,  that fancy spending their summer coding on a DBpedia project. Thank you.

 

Welcome to London, England – Connected Data London 2018

In early November, we were invited to Connected Data London again. After 2017 this great event seems to become a regular in our DBpedia schedule.

Executive Director of the DBpedia Association, Sebastian Hellmannparticipated as panel candidate in the discussion around “Building Knowledge Graphs in the Real World”. Together with speakers from Thomson Reuters, Zalando, and Textkernel, he discussed definitions of KG, best practices of how to build and use knowledge graphs as well as the recent hype about it.

Visitors of CNDL2018 had the chance to grab a copy of our brand new flyer and exchange with us about the DBpedia Databus. This event gave us the opportunity to already met early adopters of our databus  – a decentralized data publication, integration, and subscription platform. Thank you very much for that opportunity.

A year went by

2018 has gone by so fast and brought so much for DBpedia. The DBpedia Association got the chance to meet more of DBpedia’s language chapters, we developed the DBpedia Databus to an extent that it can finally be launched in spring 2019. DBpedia is a community project relying on people and with the DBpedia Databus, we create a platform that allows publishing and provides a networked data economy around it. So stay tuned for exciting news coming up next year. Until then we like to thank all DBpedia enthusiasts around the world for their research with DBpedia, and support and contributions to DBpedia. Kudos to you.

 

All that remains to say is have yourself a very merry Christmas and a dazzling New Year. May 2019 be peaceful, exciting and prosperous.

 

Yours – being in a cheerful and festive mood –

 

DBpedia Association