Category Archives: SPARQL endpoint

DBpedia at LSWT 2018

Unfortunately, with the new GDPR, we experienced some trouble with our Blog. That is why this post is published a little later than anticipated.

There you go.

With our new strategic orientation and the emergence of the DBpedia Databus, we wanted to meet some DBpedia enthusiasts of the German DBpedia Community.

The recently hosted 6th LSWT (Leipzig Semantic Web Day) on June 18th, was the perfect platform for DBpedia to meet with researchers, industry and other organizations to discuss current and future developments of the semantic web.

Under the motto “Linked Enterprises Data Services”, experts in academia and industry talked about the interlinking of open and commercial data of various domains such as e-commerce, e-government, and digital humanities.

Sören Auer, DBpedia endorser and board member as well as director of TIB, the German National Library of Science and Technology, opened the event with an exciting keynote. Recapping the evolution of the semantic and giving a glimpse into the future of integrating more cognitive processes into the study of data,  he highlighted the importance of AI, deep learning, and machine learning. They are as well as cognitive data, no longer in their early stages but advanced to fully grown up sciences.

Shortly after, Sebastian Hellmann, director of the DBpedia Association, presented the new face of DBpedia as a global open knowledge network. DBpedia is not just the most successful open knowledge graph so far, but also has a deep inside knowledge about all connected open knowledge graphs (OKG) and how they are governed. 

With our new credo connecting data is about linking people and organizations, the global DBpedia platform aims at sharing efforts of OKG governance, collaboration, and curation to maximize societal value and develop a linked data economy.

 

The DBpedia Databus functions as Metadata Subscription Repository, a platform that allows exchanging, curate and access data between multiple stakeholders. In order to maximize the potential of your data, data owners need a WebID to sign their Metadata with a private key in order to make use of the full Databus services.  Instead of one huge monolithic release every 12 months the Databus enables easier contributions and hence partial releases (core, mapping, wikidata, text, reference extraction) at their own speed but in much shorter intervals (monthly). Uploading data on the databus means connecting and comparing your data to the network. We will offer storage services, free & freemium services as well as data-as-a-service.  A first demo is available via http://downloads.dbpedia.org/databus

During the lunch break, LSWT participants had time to check out the poster presentations. 4 of the 18 posters used DBpedia as a source. One of them was Birdory, a memory game developed during the Coding Da Vinci hackathon, that started in April 2018. Moreover, other posters also used the DBpedia vocabulary.

Afternoon Session

In the afternoon, participants of LSWT2018 joined hands-on tutorials on SPARQL and WebID. During the SPARQL tutorial, ten participants learned about the different query types, graph patterns, filters, and functions as well as how to construct SPARQL queries step by step with the help of a funny Monty Python example.

Afterwards, DBpedia hosted a hands-on workshop on WebID, the password-free authentication method using semantics. The workshop aimed at enabling participants to set up a public/private key, a certificate, and a WebID.  Everything they needed to bring was a laptop and an own webspace. Supervised by DBpedia’s executive director Dr. Sebastian Hellmann and developer Jan Forberg, people had to log-into a test web service at the end of the session, to see if everything worked out. All participants seemed well satisfied with the workshop –  even if not everyone could finish it successfully they got a lot of individual help and many hints. For support purposes, DBpedia will stay close in touch with those participants.

 

Thanks to Institut für Angewandte Informatik as well to the LEDS -project and eccenca for organizing LSWT2018 and keeping the local semantic web community thriving.

 

Upcoming Events:

We are currently looking forward to our next DBpedia meetup in Lyon, France on July 3rd and the DBpedia Day co-located with Semantics 2018 in Vienna. Contributions to both events are still welcome. Send your inquiry to dbpedia@infai.org.

 

Yours

 

DBpedia Association

 

Keep using DBpedia!

Just recently, DBpedia Association member and hosting specialist, OpenLink released the DBpedia Usage report, a periodic report on the DBpedia SPARQL endpoint and associated Linked Data deployment.

The report not only gives some historical insight into DBpedia’s usage, number of visits and hits per day but especially shows statistics collected between October 2016 and December 2017. The report covers more than a year of logs from the DBpedia web service operated by OpenLink Software at http://dbpedia.org/sparql/.  

Before we want to highlight a few aspects of DBpedia’s usage we would like to thank Open Link for the continuous hosting of the DBpedia Endpoint and the creation of this report

The graph shows the average number of hits/requests per day that were made to the DBpedia service during each of the releases.
The graph shows the average number of unique visits per day made to the DBpedia service during each of the datasets.

Speaking of which, as you can see in the following tables, there has been a massive increase in the number of hits coinciding with the DBpedia 2015–10 release on April 1st, 2016.

 

 

 

 

This boost can be attributed to an intensive promotion of DBpedia via community meetings, communication with various partners in the Linked Data community and Social media presence among the community, in order to increase backlinks.

Since then, not only the numbers of hits increased but DBpedia also provided for better data quality. We are constantly working on improving accessibility, data quality and stability of the SPARQL endpoint. Kudos to Open Link for maintaining the technical baseline for DBpedia.

The table shows the usage overview of last year.

The full report is available here.

 

Subscribe to the DBpedia Newsletter, check our DBpedia Website and follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn for the latest news.

Thanks for reading and keep using DBpedia!

Yours DBpedia Associaton

 

DBpedia 3.9 released, including wider infobox coverage, additional type statements, and new YAGO and Wikidata links

Hi all,

we are happy to announce the release of DBpedia 3.9.

The most important improvements of the new release compared to DBpedia 3.8 are:

1. the new release is based on updated Wikipedia dumps dating from March / April 2013 (the 3.8 release was based on dumps from June 2012), leading to an overall increase in the number of concepts in the English edition from 3.7 to 4.0 million things.

2. the DBpedia ontology is enlarged and the number of infobox to ontology mappings has risen, leading to richer and cleaner concept descriptions.

3. we extended the DBpedia type system to also cover Wikipedia articles that do not contain an infobox.

4. we provide links pointing from DBpedia concepts to Wikidata concepts and updated the links pointing at YAGO concepts and classes, making it easier to integrate knowledge from these sources.

The English version of the DBpedia knowledge base currently describes 4.0 million things, out of which 3.22 million are classified in a consistent Ontology, including 832,000 persons, 639,000 places (including 427,000 populated places), 372,000 creative works (including 116,000 music albums, 78,000 films and 18,500 video games), 209,000 organizations (including 49,000 companies and 45,000 educational institutions), 226,000 species and 5,600 diseases.

We provide localized versions of DBpedia in 119 languages. All these versions together describe 24.9 million things, out of which 16.8 million overlap (are interlinked) with the concepts from the English DBpedia. The full DBpedia data set features labels and abstracts for 12.6 million unique things in 119 different languages; 24.6 million links to images and 27.6 million links to external web pages; 45.0 million external links into other RDF datasets, 67.0 million links to Wikipedia categories, and 41.2 million YAGO categories.

Altogether the DBpedia 3.9 release consists of 2.46 billion pieces of information (RDF triples) out of which 470 million were extracted from the English edition of Wikipedia, 1.98 billion were extracted from other language editions, and about 45 million are links to external data sets.

Detailed statistics about the DBpedia data sets in 24 popular languages are provided at Dataset Statistics.

The main changes between DBpedia 3.8 and 3.9 are described below. For additional, more detailed information please refer to the Change Log.

1. Enlarged Ontology

The DBpedia community added new classes and properties to the DBpedia ontology via the mappings wiki. The DBpedia 3.9 ontology encompasses

  • 529 classes (DBpedia 3.8: 359)
  • 927 object properties (DBpedia 3.8: 800)
  • 1290 datatype properties (DBpedia 3.8: 859)
  • 116 specialized datatype properties (DBpedia 3.8: 116)
  • 46 owl:equivalentClass and 31 owl:equivalentProperty mappings to http://schema.org

2. Additional Infobox to Ontology Mappings

The editors of the mappings wiki also defined many new mappings from Wikipedia templates to DBpedia classes. For the DBpedia 3.9 extraction, we used 3177 mappings (DBpedia 3.8: 2347 mappings), that are distributed as follows over the languages covered in the release.

3. Extended Type System to cover Articles without Infobox

Until the DBpedia 3.8 release, a concept was only assigned a type (like person or place) if the corresponding Wikipedia article contains an infobox indicating this type. The new 3.9 release now also contains type statements for articles without infobox that were inferred based on the link structure within the DBpedia knowledge base using the algorithm described in Paulheim/Bizer 2013. Applying the algorithm allowed us to provide type information for 440,000 concepts that were formerly not typed. A similar algorithm was also used to identify and remove potentially wrong links from the knowledge base.

4. New and updated RDF Links into External Data Sources

We added RDF links to Wikidata and updated the following RDF link sets pointing at other Linked Data sources: YAGO, FreebaseGeonamesGADM and EUNIS. For an overview about all data sets that are interlinked from DBpedia please refer to DBpedia Interlinking.

5. New Find Related Concepts Service

We offer a new service for finding resources that are related to a given DBpedia seed resource. More information about the service is found at DBpedia FindRelated.

Accessing the DBpedia 3.9  Release

You can download the new DBpedia datasets from http://wiki.dbpedia.org/Downloads39.

As usual, the dataset is also available as Linked Data and via the DBpedia SPARQL endpoint at http://dbpedia.org/sparql

Credits

Lots of thanks to

  • Jona Christopher Sahnwaldt (Freelancer funded by the University of Mannheim, Germany) for improving the DBpedia extraction framework, for extracting the DBpedia 3.9 data sets for all 119 languages, and for generating the updated RDF links to external data sets.
  • All editors that contributed to the DBpedia ontology mappings via the Mappings Wiki.
  • Heiko Paulheim (University of Mannheim, Germany) for inventing and implementing the algorithm to generate additional type statements for formerly untyped resources.
  • The whole Internationalization Committee for pushing the DBpedia internationalization forward.
  • Dimitris Kontokostas (University of Leipzig) for improving the DBpedia extraction framework and loading the new release onto the DBpedia download server in Leipzig.
  • Volha Bryl (University of Mannheim, Germany) for generating the statistics about the new release.
  • Petar Ristoski (University of Mannheim, Germany) for generating the updated links pointing at the GADM database of Global Administrative Areas.
  • Kingsley Idehen, Patrick van Kleef, and Mitko Iliev (all OpenLink Software) for loading the new data set into the Virtuoso instance that serves the Linked Data view and SPARQL endpoint.
  • OpenLink Software (http://www.openlinksw.com/) altogether for providing the server infrastructure for DBpedia.
  • Julien Cojan, Andrea Di Menna, Ahmed Ktob, Julien Plu, Jim Regan and others who contributed improvements to the DBpedia extraction framework via the source code repository on GitHub.

The work on the DBpedia 3.9 release was financially supported by the European Commission through the project LOD2 – Creating Knowledge out of Linked Data (http://lod2.eu/).

More information about DBpedia is found at http://dbpedia.org/About as well as in the new overview article about the project.

Have fun with the new DBpedia release!

Cheers,

Chris Bizer and Christopher Sahnwaldt

New DBpedia Overview Article

We are pleased to announce that a new overview article for DBpedia is available.

The article covers several aspects of the DBpedia community project:

  • The DBpedia extraction framework.
  • The mappings wiki as the central structure for maintaining the community-curated DBpedia ontology.
  • Statistics on the multilingual support in DBpedia.
  • DBpedia live synchronisation with Wikipedia.
  • Statistics on the interlinking of DBpedia with other parts of the LOD cloud (incoming and outgoing links).
  • Several usage statistics: What kind of queries are asked against DBpedia and how did that change over the past years? How much traffic do the official static and live endpoint as well as the download server have? What are the most popular DBpedia datasets?
  • A description of use cases and applications of DBpedia in several areas (drop me mail if important applications are missing).
  • The relation of DBpedia to the YAGO, Freebase and WikiData projects.
  • Future challenges for the DBpedia project.

After our ISWC 2009 paper on DBpedia, this is the (long overdue) new reference article for DBpedia, which should provide a good introduction to the project. We submitted the article as a system report to the Semantic Web journal.

Download article as PDF.