Category Archives: tools

Chaudron, chawdron , cauldron and DBpedia

Meet Chaudron

Before getting into the technical details of, did you know the term Chaudron derives from Old French and denotes a large metal cooking pot? The word was used as an alternative form of chawdron which means entrails.  Entrails and cauldron –  a combo that seems quite fitting with Halloween coming along.

And now for something completely different

To begin with, Chaudron is a dataset of more than two million triples. It complements DBpedia with physical measures. The triples are automatically extracted from Wikipedia infoboxes using a pattern-matching and a formal grammar approaches.  This dataset adds triples to the existing DBpedia resources. Additionally, it includes measures on various resources such as chemical elements, railway, people places, aircrafts, dams and many other types of resources.

Chaudron was published on wiki.dbpedia.org and is one of many other projects and applications featuring DBpedia.

Want to find out more about our DBpedia Applications? Why not read about the DBpedia Chatbot, DBpedia Entity or the NLI-Go DBpedia Demo.?

Happy reading & happy Halloween!

Yours DBpedia Association

 

PS: In case you want your DBpedia tool, demo or any kind of application published on our Website and the DBpedia Blog, fill out this form and submit your information.

 

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Retrospective: GSoC 2018

With all the beta-testing, the evaluations of the community survey part I and part II and the preparations for the Semantics 2018 we lost almost sight of telling you about the final results of GSoC 2018. Following we present you a short recap of this year’s students and projects that made it to the finishing line of GSoC 2018.

 

Et Voilà

We started out with six students that committed to GSoC projects. However, in the course of the summer, some dropped out or did not pass the midterm evaluation. In the end, we had three finalists that made it through the program.

Meet Bharat Suri

… who worked on “Complex Embeddings for OOV Entities”. The aim of this project was to enhance the DBpedia Knowledge Base by enabling the model to learn from the corpus and generate embeddings for different entities, such as classes, instances and properties.  His code is available in his GitHub repository. Tommaso Soru, Thiago Galery and Peng Xu supported Bharat throughout the summer as his DBpedia mentors.

Meet Victor Fernandez

.. who worked on a “Web application to detect incorrect mappings across DBpedia’s in different languages”. The aim of his project was to create a web application and API to aid in automatically detecting inaccurate DBpedia mappings. The mappings for each language are often not aligned, causing inconsistencies in the quality of the RDF generated. The final code of this project is available in Victor’s repository on GitHub. He was mentored by Mariano Rico and Nandana Mihindukulasooriya.

Meet Aman Mehta

.. whose project aimed at building a model which allows users to query DBpedia directly using natural language without the need to have any previous experience in SPARQL. His task was to train a Sequence-2-Sequence Neural Network model to translate any Natural Language Query (NLQ) into the corresponding sentence encoding SPARQL query. See the results of this project in Aman’s GitHub repositoryTommaso Soru and Ricardo Usbeck were his DBpedia mentors during the summer.

Finally, these projects will contribute to an overall development of DBpedia. We are very satisfied with the contributions and results our students produced.  Furthermore, we like to genuinely thank all students and mentors for their effort. We hope to be in touch and see a few faces again next year.

A special thanks goes out to all mentors and students whose projects did not make it through.

GSoC Mentor Summit

Now it is the mentors’ turn to take part in this year GSoC mentor summit, October 12th till 14th. This year, Mariano Rico and Thiago Galery will represent DBpedia at the event. Their task is to engage in a vital discussion about this years program, about lessons learned, highlights and drawbacks they experienced during the summer. Hopefully, they return with new ideas from the exchange with mentors from other open source projects. In turn, we hope to improve our part of the program for students and mentors.

Sit tight, follow us on Twitter and we will update you about the event soon.

Yours DBpedia Association

DBpedia Chapters – Survey Evaluation – Episode Two

Welcome back to part two of the evaluation of the surveys, we conducted with the DBpedia chapters.

Survey Evaluation – Episode Two

The second survey focused on technical matters. We asked the chapters about the usage of DBpedia services and tools, technical problems and challenges and potential reasons to overcome them.  Have a look below.

Again, only nine out of 21 DBpedia chapters participated in this survey. And again, that means, the results only represent roughly 42% of the DBpedia chapter population

The good news is, all chapters maintain a local DBpedia endpoint. Yay! More than 55 % of the chapters perform their own extraction. The rest of them apply a hybrid approach reusing some datasets from DBpedia releases and additionally, extract some on their own.

Datasets, Services and Applications

In terms of frequency of dataset updates, the situation is as follows:  44,4 % of the chapters update them once a year. The answers of the remaining ones differ in equal shares, depending on various factors. See the graph below. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When it comes to the maintenance of links to local datasets, most of the chapters do not have additional ones. However, some do maintain links to, for example, Greek WordNet, the National Library of Greece Authority record, Geonames.jp and the Japanese WordNet. Furthermore, some of the chapters even host other datasets of local interest, but mostly in a separate endpoint, so they keep separate graphs.

Apart from hosting their own endpoint, most chapters maintain one or the other additional service such as Spotlight, LodLive or LodView.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Moreover,  the chapters have additional applications they developed on top of DBpedia data and services.

Besides, they also gave us some reasons why they were not able to deploy DBpedia related services. See their replies below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DBpedia Chapter set-up

Lastly, we asked the technical heads of the chapters what the hardest task for setting up their chapter had been.  The answers, again, vary as the starting position of each chapter differed. Read a few of their replies below.

The hardest technical task for setting up the chapter was:

  • to keep virtuoso up to date
  • the chapter specific setup of DBpedia plugin in Virtuoso
  • the Extraction Framework
  • configuring Virtuoso for serving data using server’s FQDN and Nginx proxying
  • setting up the Extraction Framework, especially for abstracts
  • correctly setting up the extraction process and the DBpedia facet browser
  • fixing internationalization issues, and updating the endpoint
  • keeping the extraction framework working and up to date
  • updating the server to the specific requirements for further compilation – we work on Debian

 

Final  words

With all the data and results we gathered, we will get together with our chapter coordinator to develop a strategy of how to improve technical as well as organizational issues the surveys revealed. By that, we hope to facilitate a better exchange between the chapters and with us, the DBpedia Association. Moreover, we intend to minimize barriers for setting up and maintaining a DBpedia chapter so that our chapter community may thrive and prosper.

In the meantime, spread your work and share it with the community. Do not forget to follow and tag us on Twitter ( @dbpedia ). You may also want to subscribe to our newsletter.

We will keep you posted about any updates and news.

Yours

DBpedia Association

Meet the DBpedia Chatbot

This year’s GSoC is slowly coming to an end with final evaluations already being submitted. In order to bridge the waiting time until final results are published, we like to draw your attention to a former project and great tool that was developed during last years’ GSoC.

Meet the DBpedia Chatbot. 

DBpedia Chatbot is a conversational Chatbot for DBpedia which is accessible through the following platforms:

  1. A Web Interface
  2. Slack
  3. Facebook Messenger

Main Purpose

The bot is capable of responding to users in the form of simple short text messages or through more elaborate interactive messages. Users can communicate or respond to the bot through text and also through interactions (such as clicking on buttons/links). There are 4 main purposes for the bot. They are:

  1. Answering factual questions
  2. Answering questions related to DBpedia
  3. Expose the research work being done in DBpedia as product features
  4. Casual conversation/banter
Question Types

The bot tries to answer text-based questions of the following types:

Natural Language Questions
  1. Give me the capital of Germany
  2. Who is Obama?
Location Information
  1. Where is the Eiffel Tower?
  2. Where is France’s capital?
Service Checks

Users can ask the bot to check if vital DBpedia services are operational.

  1. Is DBpedia down?
  2. Is lookup online?
Language Chapters

Users can ask basic information about specific DBpedia local chapters.

  1. DBpedia Arabic
  2. German DBpedia
Templates

These are predominantly questions related to DBpedia for which the bot provides predefined templatized answers. Some examples include:

  1. What is DBpedia?
  2. How can I contribute?
  3. Where can I find the mapping tool?
Banter

Messages which are casual in nature fall under this category. For example:

  1. Hi
  2. What is your name?

if you like to have a closer look at the internal processes and how the chatbot was developed, check out the DBpedia GitHub pages. 

DBpedia Chatbot was published on wiki.dbpedia.org and is one of many other projects and applications featuring DBpedia.

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In case you want your DBpedia based tool or demo to publish on our website just follow the link and submit your information, we will do the rest.

 

Yours

DBpedia Association

DBpedia Entity – Standard Test Collection for Entity Search over DBpedia

Today we are featuring DBpedia Entity, in our blog series of introducting interesting DBpedia applications and tools to the DBpedia community and beyond. Read on and enjoy.

DBpedia-Entity is a standard test collection for entity search over the DBpedia knowledge base. It is meant for evaluating retrieval systems that return a ranked list of entities (DBpedia URIs) in response to a free text user query.

The first version of the collection (DBpedia-Entity v1) was released in 2013, based on DBpedia v3.7 [1]. It was created by assembling search queries from a number of entity-oriented benchmarking campaigns and mapping relevant results to DBpedia. An updated version of the collection, DBpedia-Entity v2, has been released in 2017, as a result of a collaborative effort between the IAI group of the University of Stavanger, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Wayne State University, and Carnegie Mellon University [2]. It has been published at the 40th International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval (SIGIR’17), where it received a Best Short Paper Honorable Mention Award. See the paper and poster.

DBpedia Entity was published on wiki.dbpedia.org and is one of many other projects and applications featuring DBpedia.

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French DBpedia enthusiasts joined the meetup in Lyon.

Rencontre avec les français DBpédiens à Lyon

In cooperation with Thomas Riechert (HTWK/InfAI), the DBpedia Association organized our second DBpedia meetup this year, this time in Lyon. On July 3rd, 2018, we met the French DBpedia Community at the ENS in person and presented the vision of the new DBpedia Databus, an opportunity which simplifies the work with data.

First and foremost, we would like to thank the Institute for Applied Informatics for supporting our community and the LARHRA Laboratory as well as the ENS for hosting our community meetup. Special thanks go to Thomas Riechert and Vincent Alamercery (LARHRA Lyon) for organizing the event.

Opening Session

Sebastian Hellmann opened up the meetup in Lyon.

Sebastian Hellmann (AKSW/KILT) opened up the meetup in Lyon by introducing the DBpedia development strategy and the new DBpedia Databus to the French DBpedia community (slides). Afterwards, Elmahdi Korfed from INRIA presented new features and tools as results developed in  the French DBpedia chapter (slides):

In the following months, Elmahdi plans to work on the DBpedia historic live version and the DBpedia wiki commons. His research will be presented during our 12th DBpedia Community meeting on September 10th, in Vienna.

Elmahdi Korfed from INRIA presented new features developed in the French DBpedia chapter.

Following Elmahdi, Francesco Beretta presented LARHRA laboratory and its different research areas. In particular, he introduced the Data for History Consortium which is an international consortium founded in 2017 with the aim of improving geo-historical data interoperability in the semantic web.

Afternoon Track

The afternoon track started out with an inspiring presentation by Adam Sanchez from the University of Grenoble. He talked about ‘RDFization of a relational database from medicine domain using Ontop’ (slides) and introduced the Ontop mappings. Afterwards, Oscar Rodríguez Rocha (University of Côte d’Azur) showcased the application ‘Automatic Generation Educational Quizzes’ from DBpedia (slides) and explained how the automatic generation of quizzes works based on the game Les Incollables.

The meeting concluded with a dynamic discussion on the DBpedia Databus and potential collaborations between the DBpedia Association and the French DBpedia Chapter.

All slides and presentations are available on our Website. You can find more feedback and photos about the event on Twitter via #DBpediaLyon.

You still can’t get enough of DBpedia?

Don’t worry, we already have another meeting of the DBpedia community in the pipeline. Our 12th DBpedia Community meeting is scheduled for September 10th and preparations on the program are already in full swing. Our DBpedia Day will kick-off this year’s edition of SEMANTiCS 2018, hosted at TU Vienna and brings the European DBpedia community together.

You want to contribute? Please submit your proposal and be a part of our amazing program. Register here and meet us and other DBpedia enthusiasts in Vienna. We are looking forward to your contribution.  

For latest news and updates check Twitter, Facebook and our Website or subscribe to our newsletter.

See you soon!

Yours,

DBpedia Association

 

DBpedia at LSWT 2018

Unfortunately, with the new GDPR, we experienced some trouble with our Blog. That is why this post is published a little later than anticipated.

There you go.

With our new strategic orientation and the emergence of the DBpedia Databus, we wanted to meet some DBpedia enthusiasts of the German DBpedia Community.

The recently hosted 6th LSWT (Leipzig Semantic Web Day) on June 18th, was the perfect platform for DBpedia to meet with researchers, industry and other organizations to discuss current and future developments of the semantic web.

Under the motto “Linked Enterprises Data Services”, experts in academia and industry talked about the interlinking of open and commercial data of various domains such as e-commerce, e-government, and digital humanities.

Sören Auer, DBpedia endorser and board member as well as director of TIB, the German National Library of Science and Technology, opened the event with an exciting keynote. Recapping the evolution of the semantic and giving a glimpse into the future of integrating more cognitive processes into the study of data,  he highlighted the importance of AI, deep learning, and machine learning. They are as well as cognitive data, no longer in their early stages but advanced to fully grown up sciences.

Shortly after, Sebastian Hellmann, director of the DBpedia Association, presented the new face of DBpedia as a global open knowledge network. DBpedia is not just the most successful open knowledge graph so far, but also has a deep inside knowledge about all connected open knowledge graphs (OKG) and how they are governed. 

With our new credo connecting data is about linking people and organizations, the global DBpedia platform aims at sharing efforts of OKG governance, collaboration, and curation to maximize societal value and develop a linked data economy.

 

The DBpedia Databus functions as Metadata Subscription Repository, a platform that allows exchanging, curate and access data between multiple stakeholders. In order to maximize the potential of your data, data owners need a WebID to sign their Metadata with a private key in order to make use of the full Databus services.  Instead of one huge monolithic release every 12 months the Databus enables easier contributions and hence partial releases (core, mapping, wikidata, text, reference extraction) at their own speed but in much shorter intervals (monthly). Uploading data on the databus means connecting and comparing your data to the network. We will offer storage services, free & freemium services as well as data-as-a-service.  A first demo is available via http://downloads.dbpedia.org/databus

During the lunch break, LSWT participants had time to check out the poster presentations. 4 of the 18 posters used DBpedia as a source. One of them was Birdory, a memory game developed during the Coding Da Vinci hackathon, that started in April 2018. Moreover, other posters also used the DBpedia vocabulary.

Afternoon Session

In the afternoon, participants of LSWT2018 joined hands-on tutorials on SPARQL and WebID. During the SPARQL tutorial, ten participants learned about the different query types, graph patterns, filters, and functions as well as how to construct SPARQL queries step by step with the help of a funny Monty Python example.

Afterwards, DBpedia hosted a hands-on workshop on WebID, the password-free authentication method using semantics. The workshop aimed at enabling participants to set up a public/private key, a certificate, and a WebID.  Everything they needed to bring was a laptop and an own webspace. Supervised by DBpedia’s executive director Dr. Sebastian Hellmann and developer Jan Forberg, people had to log-into a test web service at the end of the session, to see if everything worked out. All participants seemed well satisfied with the workshop –  even if not everyone could finish it successfully they got a lot of individual help and many hints. For support purposes, DBpedia will stay close in touch with those participants.

 

Thanks to Institut für Angewandte Informatik as well to the LEDS -project and eccenca for organizing LSWT2018 and keeping the local semantic web community thriving.

 

Upcoming Events:

We are currently looking forward to our next DBpedia meetup in Lyon, France on July 3rd and the DBpedia Day co-located with Semantics 2018 in Vienna. Contributions to both events are still welcome. Send your inquiry to dbpedia@infai.org.

 

Yours

 

DBpedia Association

 

DBpedia citations & references challenge

In the latest release (2015-10) DBpedia started exploring the citation and reference data from Wikipedia and we were pleasantly surprised by the rich data we managed to extract.

This data holds huge potential, especially for the Wikidata challenge of providing a reference source for every statement. It describes not only a lot of bibliographical data, but also a lot of web pages and many other sources around the web.

The data we extract at the moment is quite raw and can be improved in many different ways. Some of the potential improvements are:

We welcome contributions that improve the existing citation dataset in any way; and we are open to collaboration and helping. Results will be presented at the next DBpedia meeting: 15 September 2016 in Leipzig, co-located with SEMANTiCS 2016. Each participant should submit a short description of his/her contribution by Monday 12 September 2016 and present his/her work at the meeting. Comments, questions can be posted on the DBpedia discussion & developer lists or in our new DBpedia ideas page.

Submissions will be judged by the Organizing Committee and the best two will receive a prize.

Organizing Committee

Stay tuned and follow us on facebook, twitter or visit our website for the latest news.

Your DBpedia Association

A retrospective of the 5th DBpedia community meeting in California

A belated Happy New Year to all DBpedia enthusiasts !!!

Two weeks of 2016 have already passed and it is about time to reflect on the past three months which were revolving around the 5th DBpedia meeting in the USA.

After 4 successful meetings in Poznan, Dublin, Leipzig and Amsterdam, we thought it is about time to cross the Atlantic and meet the US-part of the DBpedia community. On November 5th 2015, our 5th DBpedia Community meeting was held at the world famous Stanford University, in Palo Alto California.

First and foremost, we would like to thank Michel Dumontier, Associate Professor of Medicine at Stanford University, and hisIMG_20151105_192240  Laboratory for Biomedical Knowledge Discovery for hosting this great event and giving so many US-based DBpedia enthusiasts a platform for exchange and to meet in person. The event was constantly commented on and discussed not just inside University premises but also online, via Twitter #DBpedia  CA. We would also like to thank the rest of the organizers: Pablo Mendes, Marco Fossati, Dimitris Kontokostas and Sebastian Hellmann for devoting a lot of time to plan the meeting and coordinate with the presenters.

We set out to the US with two main goals. Firstly, we wanted DBpedia and Knowledge Graph professionals and enthusiasts to network and discuss ideas about how to improve DBpedia. Secondly, the event also aimed at finding new partners, developers and supporters to help DBpedia grow professionally, in terms of competencies and data, as well as to enlarge the DBpedia community itself to spread the word and to raise awareness of the DBpedia brand.

Therefore, we invited representatives of the best-known actors in the Data community such as:

  • Michel Dumontier, Stanford
  • Anshu Jain, IBM Watson
  • Nicolas Torzec, Yahoo!
  • Yves Raimond, Netflix
  • Karthik Gomadam, Independent
  • Joakim Soderberg, Blippar
  • Alkis Simitsis, HP Labs
  • Yashar Mehdad, Yahoo! Labs

…who addressed interesting topics and together with all the DBpedia enthusiasts engaged in productive discussion and raised controversial questions.

Pre-event

The meeting itself was co-located with an pre-event designed as workshop, giving the attending companies a lot of room and time to raise questions and discuss “hot topics”. Classification schemas and multilingualism have been on top of the list of topics that were most interesting for the companies invited. In this interactive setting, our guest from Evernote, BlippAR, World University and Wikimedia answered questions about the DBpedia ontology and mappings, Wikipedia categories as well as about similarities and differences with Wikidata.

Main Event

Following the pre-event, the main event attracted attendees with lightning talks from major companies interesting to the DBpedia community.

The host of the DBpedia Meeting, Michel Dumontier from Stanford opened the main event with a short introduction of his group’s focus in biomedical data. He and his group currently focus on integrating datasets to extract maximal value from data. Right in the beginning of the DBpedia meeting, Dumontier highlighted the value of already existing yet unexploited data out there.

During the meeting there have been two main thematic foci, onDSC00807e concerning the topics companies were interested in and raised during the session. Experts from Yahoo, Netflix, Diffbot, IBM Watson and Unicode addressed issue such as fact extraction from text via NLP, knowledge base construction techniques and recommender systems leveraging data from a knowledge base and multilingual abbreviation datasets.

The second focus of this event revolved around DBpedia and encyclopedic Knowledge Graphs including augmented reality addressed by BlippAR and by Nuance. We have some of the talks summed up for you here. Also check out the slides provided in addition to the summary of some talks to get a deeper insight into the event.

Nicolas Torzec, Yahoo! – Wikipedia, DBpedia and the Yahoo! Knowledge Graph

He described how DBpedia played a key role in the beginning of the Knowledge Graph effort at Yahoo! They decided on using the Extraction Framework directly, not the provided data dumps, which allowed them to continuously update as Wikipedia changed. Yashar, also from Yahoo! focused on multilingual NE detection and linking. He described how users make financial choices based on availability of products in their local language, which highlights the importance of multilinguality (also a core objective of the DBpedia effort).

Anshu Jain,  IBM Watson  – Watson Knowledge Graph – DBpedia Meetup

The focus of this presentation was the effort by IBM Watson team  their effort as not building a knowledge graph, but building a platform for working with knowledge graphs. For them, graph is just an abstraction, not a data structure. He highlighted that context is very important, and one

 

Yves Raimond, Netflix – Knowledge Graphs @ NetflixYves Raimond from Netflix observed that in their platform, every impression is a recommendation. They rely on lots of machine learning algorithms, and pondered on the role of knowledge graphs in that setting. Will everything (user + metadata) end up in a graph so that algorithms learn from that?Click here for the complete presentation.

Joakim Soderberg, BlippAR –

Joakim Soderberg mentioned that at Blippar it’s all about the experience. They are focusing on augmented reality, which can benefit from information drawn from many sources including DBpedia.

David Martin, Nuance – using DBpedia with Nuance

David Martin from Nuance talked about how DBpedia is used as a source of named entities. He observes that multi role ranking is an important issue, for instance, the difference in the role of Arnold Schwarzenegger as politician or actor. Click here for the complete presentation.

Karthik Gomadam, Accenture Technology Labs – Rethinking the Enterprise Data Stack

Karthik Gomadam discussed data harmonization in the context of linked enterprise data.

Alkis Simitsis, Hewlett Packard – Complex Graph Computations over Enterprise Data

He talked about complex graph computations over enterprise data, while Georgia Koutrika from HP Labs presented their solution for fusing knowledge into recommendations.

Other topics discussed were:

  • Steven Loomis, IBM – Automatically extracted abbreviated data with Dbpedia
  • Scott McLeod, World University and School – MIT Open Courseware with Wikipedia. Classes in virtual worlds.
  • Diffbot’s developers talked about structuring the Web with their product with the help of DBpedia and DBpedia Spotlight.

You find some more presentations here:

 

Feedback from attendees and via our Twitter stream #DBpediaCA was generally very positive and insightful. The choice of invited talks was appreciated unanimously, and so was the idea of having lightning talks. In the spirit of previous DBpedia Meetings, we allocated time for all attendees that were interested in speaking. Some commented that they would have liked to have more time to ask questions and discuss, while others thought the meeting was too late. We will consider the trade-offs and try to improve in the next iteration. There was strong support from attendees for meeting again as soon as possible!

So now, we are looking forward to the next DBpedia community meeting which will be held on February 12, 2016 in the Hague, Netherlands. So, save the date and visit the event page. We will keep you informed via the DBpedia Website and Blog.                   

Finally, we would like to thank Yahoo! for sponsoring the catering during the DBpedia community meeting. We would also like to acknowledge Google Summer of Code as the reason Marco and Dimitris were in California and for covering part of their travel expenses.

The event was initiated by the DBpedia association. The following people received travel grants by the DBpedia association: Marco Fossati; Dimitris Kontokostas; Joachim Daiber

DBpedia Spotlight V0.7 released

DBpedia Spotlight is an entity linking tool for connecting free text to DBpedia through the recognition and disambiguation of entities and concepts from the DBpedia KB.

We are happy to announce Version 0.7 of DBpedia Spotlight, which is also the first official release of the probabilistic/statistical implementation.

More information about as well as updated evaluation results for DBpedia Spotlight V0.7 are found in this paper:

Joachim Daiber, Max Jakob, Chris Hokamp, Pablo N. Mendes: Improving Efficiency and Accuracy in Multilingual Entity ExtractionISEM2013. 

The changes to the statistical implementation include:

  • smaller and faster models through quantization of counts, optimization of search and some pruning
  • better handling of case
  • various fixes in Spotlight and PigNLProc
  • models can now be created without requiring a Hadoop and Pig installation
  • UIMA support by @mvnural
  • support for confidence value

See the release notes at [1] and the updated demos at [4].

Models for Spotlight 0.7 can be found here [2].

Additionally, we now provide the raw Wikipedia counts, which we hope will prove useful for research and development of new models [3].

A big thank you to all developers who made contributions to this version (with special thanks to Faveeo and Idio). Huge thanks to Jo for his leadership and continued support to the community.

Cheers,
Pablo Mendes,

on behalf of Joachim Daiber and the DBpedia Spotlight developer community.

[1] – https://github.com/dbpedia-spotlight/dbpedia-spotlight/releases/tag/release-0.7

[2] – http://spotlight.sztaki.hu/downloads/

[3] – http://spotlight.sztaki.hu/downloads/raw

[4] – http://dbpedia-spotlight.github.io/demo/

(This message is an adaptation of Joachim Daiber’s message to the DBpedia Spotlight list. Edited to suit this broader community and give credit to him.)