Tag Archives: DBpedia Association

More than 130 knowledge graph enthusiasts joined the KGiA event.

Opening the KG in Action event

The SEMANTiCS Onsite Conference 2020 had to be postponed till September 2021. To bridge the gap until 2021, we took this opportunity to organize the Knowledge Graphs in Action (KGiA) online track as a SEMANTiCS satellite event on October 6, 2020. This new online conference is a combination of two existing events: the DBpedia Community Meeting and the annual Spatial Linked Data conference organised by EuroSDR and the Platform Linked Data Netherlands. We combined the best of both and as a bonus we added a track about Geo-information Integration organized by EuroSDR. As special joint sessions we presented four keynote speakers. 

First and foremost, we would like to thank the SEMANTiCS, EuroSDR and Platform Linked Data Netherlands for organizing the KGiA online event and many thanks to all chairs who supported the conference.

Following, we will give you a brief retrospective about the keynote presentations and talks.

Opening & Keynote #1

The Knowledge Graphs in Action conference was opened with a keynote presentation ‘Data Infrastructure for Energy System Models’ by Carsten Hoyer-Klick (German Aerospace Center). He presented LOD GEOSS, a project for the development of a distributed data infrastructure for the analysis of energy systems. The project is about the development of networked database concepts based on the ideas of linked open data and the semantic web for input and output data of energy system models in energy systems analysis. Afterwards the conference chairs offered three parallel sessions in the morning. 

Morning Sessions 

Session 1: Spatial Linked Data Country Update

In this session 7 speakers presented the uptake and latest progress of Spatial Linked Data adoption in European countries, either within national mapping agencies or beyond.

Session 2: VGI country presentations

There is an increasing use of crowdsourced geo-information (CGI) in spatial data applications by National Mapping and Cadastral Agencies (NMCAs). Applications range from using CGI for supporting the actualisation of spatial data to adding extra content, such as land use, building entrances, road barriers, sensors placed in the public space and many more. This session hosted five presentations from NMCAs showing the status of their CGI integration in mapping applications and processes.

Session 3: DBpedia Member presentations

Members of the DBpedia Association presented their latest tools, applications and technical developments in this session. Filipe Mesquita (Diffbot) opened the member session with his talk ‘Beyond Human Curation: How Diffbot Is Building A Knowledge Graph of the Web’. Also ImageSnippets, timbr.ai and GNOSS gave interesting and delightful talks about their technical developments. Vassil Momtchev from Ontotext closed the session by giving insights into the GraphDB 9.4.   

For further details of the presentations follow the links to the slides on the event page.

Afternoon Sessions 

Keynote #2

The afternoon sessions started with an interesting keynote by Peter Mooney (Maynooth University). He talked about the opportunities for a more integrated approach to Geo-information integration. 

Dutch National Graph as a Digital Twin

After the second keynote Sebastian Hellmann, the CEO of the DBpedia Association, presented the development and methodology of the National Knowledge Graph for the Netherlands. In cooperation with Dutch partners, DBpedia invested two months to develop this new knowledge graph. His insightful presentation was followed by Benedicte Bucher (University Gustave Eiffel) talking about ‘Knowledge Graph on spatial digital assets in European’. She also presented the EuroSDR LDG initiative in many details.      

Afternoon Parallel Sessions

Session 4: Transforming Linked Data into a networked data economy – DBpedia Chapter Session

In the DBpedia Chapter Session, members of different European DBpedia chapters gave an overview about the data landscape in their countries. They presented identified business opportunities and important challenges, such as automated clearance of licenses in their countries. Enno Meijers (National Library of the Netherlands) summarized the data landscape in the Netherlands. There were also presentations about the data landscape in Brazil, Spain, Austria and Poland.   

Session 5: EuroSDR VGI data wrangling

This session intends to uncover new combinations and integration of CGI data with data from NMCAs which demonstrate the added value for map creation and map usage. Data wrangling (the process of creating small reproducible data processing workflows) is deployed for this work by using and combining existing geospatial software (desktop, web and mobile). In this session the results of the data wrangling process were presented. 

Session 6: Spatial Session

In this session, two speakers presented how they built knowledge graphs, and in the second part three presenters gave insights into tooling and presented the state of the art on working with Linked Data.

For further details of the presentations follow the links to the slides on the event page.

Keynote #3 and #4

Keynote #3 ‘Spatial Knowledge in Action – Deep semantics, geospatial thinking, and new cartographies’ was given by Marinos Kavouras (National Technical University of Athens). Marinos stated that the power of maps and modern cartographic language proves to have a new role for society at large, as an indispensable communication and cognitive tool. The KG in Action conference ended with the keynote presentation ‘Know, Know Where, KnowWhereGraph’ by Krzysztof Janowicz (University of California). During his live talk from California, Krzysztof provided an overview of ideas and hopes for creating geo-specific knowledge graphs and geo-enrichment services on top of this graph to address some of the aforementioned challenges.

In case you missed the event, all slides and presentations are also available on the DBpeda website. We will upload all recordings on the DBpedia youtube channel. Further insights, feedback and photos about the event are available on Twitter (#KGiA hashtag).

We are now looking forward to 2021. We plan to have meetings at the Knowledge Graph Conference and the SEMANTiCS conference in Amsterdam. Stay safe and check Twitter, LinkedIn and our Website or subscribe to our Newsletter for the latest news and information.

Yours,

DBpedia Association

Call for Participants: DBpedia Autumn Hackathon

Dear DBpedians, Linked Data savvies and Ontologists,

We would like to invite you to join the DBpedia Autumn Hackathon 2020 as a new format to contribute to DBpedia, gain fame, win small prizes and experience the latest technology provided by DBpedia Association members. 
The hackathon is part of the Knowledge Graphs in Action conference on October 6, 2020. 

Timeline 

  • Registration of participants – main communication channel will be the #hackathon channel in DBpedia Slack (sign up, then add yourself to the channel). If you wish to receive a reminder email on Sep 21st, 2020 you can leave your email address in this form.
  • Until September 14th – preparation phase, participating organizations prepare details and track formation. Additional tracks can be proposed, please contact dbpedia-events@infai.org.
  • Announcement of details for each track, including prizes, participating data, demos as well as tools and tasks. Please check updates on the Hackathon website. – September 21st, 2020
  • Hacking period, coordinated via DBpedia slack September 21st to October 1st, 2020
  • Submission of hacking result (3 min video and 2-3 paragraph summary with links, if not stated otherwise in the track) – October 1st, 2020 at 23:59 Hawaii Time
  • Final Event, Each track chair will present a short recap of the track and announces prizes or summarizes the result of hacking. – October 5th, 2020 at 16:00 CEST
  • Knowledge Graphs in Action Event (see program) – October 6th, 2020 at 9:50 – 15:30 CEST
  • Results and videos are documented on the DBpedia Website and the DBpedia Youtube channel.

Member Tracks 

The member tracks are hosted by DBpedia Association members, who are technology leaders in the area of Knowledge Engineering. Additional tracks can be proposed until Sep 14th, please contact dbpedia-events@infai.org.

  • timbr SQL Knowledge Graph: Learn how to model, map and query ontologies in timbr and then model an ontology of GDELT, map it to the GDELT database, and answer a number of questions that currently are quite impossible to get from the BigQuery GDELT database. Cash prizes planned. 
  • GNOSS Knowledge Graph Builder: Give meaning to your organisation’s documents and data with a Knowledge Graph. 
  • ImageSnippets: Labeling images with semantic descriptions. Use DBpedia spotlight and an entity matching lookup to select DBpedia terms to describe images. Then explore the resulting dataset through searches over inference graphs and explore the ImageSnippets dataset through our SPARQL endpoint. Prizes planned. 
  • Diffbot: Build Your Own Knowledge Graph! Use the Natural Language API to extract triples from natural language text and expand these triples with data from the Diffbot Knowledge Graph (10+ billion entities, 1+ trillion facts). Check out the demo. All participants will receive access to the Diffbot KG and tools for (non-commercial) research for one year ($10,000 value).

Dutch National Knowledge Graph Track

Following the DBpedia FlexiFusion approach, we are currently flexi-fusing a huge, dbpedia-style knowledge graph that will connect many Linked Data sources and data silos relevant to the country of the Netherlands. We hope that this will eventually crystallize a well-connected sub-community linked open data (LOD) cloud in the same manner as DBpedia crystallized the original LOD cloud with some improvements (you could call it LOD Mark II). Data and hackathon details will be announced on 21st of September.

Organising committee:

Improve DBpedia Track

A community track, where everybody can participate and contribute in improving existing DBpedia components, in particular the extraction framework, the mappings, the ontology, data quality test cases, new extractors, links and other extensions. Best individual contributions will be acknowledged on the DBpedia website by anointing the WebID/Foaf profile.

(chaired by Milan Dojchinovski and Marvin Hofer from the DBpedia Association & InfAI and the DBpedia Hacking Committee, please message @m1ci to volunteer to the hacking committee)

DBpedia Open Innovation Track 

(not part of the hackathon, pre-announcement)

For the DBpedia Spring Event 2021, we are planning an Open Innovation Track, where DBpedians can showcase their applications. This endeavour will not be part of the hackathon as we are looking for significant showcases with development effort of months & years built on the core infrastructure of DBpedia such as the SPARQL endpoint, the data, lookup, spotlight, DBpedia Live, etc. Details will be announced during the Hackathon Final Event on October 5.  

(chaired by Heiko Paulheim et al.)

Stay tuned and check Twitter, Facebook and our Website or subscribe to our Newsletter for latest news and information.

The DBpedia Organizing Team


‘Knowledge Graphs in Action’ online event on Oct 6, 2020

Due to current circumstances, the SEMANTiCS Onsite Conference 2020 had, unfortunately, to be postponed till September 2021. To bridge the gap until 2021, DBpedia, PLDN and EuroSDR will organize a SEMANTiCS satellite event online, on October 6, 2020. We set up an exciting themed program around ‘Knowledge Graphs in Action: DBpedia, Linked Geodata and Geo-information Integration’.

This new event is a combination of two already existing ones: the DBpedia Community Meeting, which is regularly held as part of the SEMANTiCS, and the annual Spatial Linked Data conference organised by EuroSDR and the Platform Linked Data Nederland. We fused both together and as a bonus, we added a track about Geo-information Integration hosted by EuroSDR. For the joint opening session, we recruited four amazing keynote speakers to kick the event off.    

Highlights of the Knowledge Graph in Action event

– Hackathon (starts 2 weeks earlier)

– Keynote by Carsten Hoyer-Click, German Aerospace Center

– Keynote by Marinos Kavouras, National Technical University of Athens

– Keynote by Peter Mooney, Maynooth University

– Spatial Linked Data Country Session

– DBpedia Chapter Session

– Self Service GIS Session

– DBpedia Showcase Session

Quick Facts

– Web URL: https://wiki.dbpedia.org/meetings/KnowledgeGraphsInAction

– When: October 6, 2020

– Where: The conference will take place fully online.

Schedule

– Please check the schedule for the upcoming Knowledge Graphs in Action event here: https://wiki.dbpedia.org/meetings/KnowledgeGraphsInAction  

Registration 

– Attending the conference is free. Registration is required though. Please get in touch with us if you have any problems during the registration stage. Register here to be part of the meeting: https://wiki.dbpedia.org/meetings/KnowledgeGraphsInAction 

Organisation

– Benedicte Bucher, University Gustave Eiffel, IGN, EuroSDR

– Erwin Folmer, Kadaster, University of Twente, Platform Linked Data Netherlands

– Rob Lemmens, University of Twente

– Sebastian Hellmann, AKSW/KILT, DBpedia Association

– Julia Holze, DBpedia Association

Don’t think twice and register now! Join the Knowledge Graph in Action event on October 6, 2020 to catch up with the latest research results and developments in the Semantic Web Community. Register here and meet us and other SEMANTiCS enthusiasts.

For latest news and updates check Twitter, LinkedIn, the DBpedia blog and our Website or subscribe to our newsletter.

We are looking forward to meeting you online!

Julia

on behalf of the DBpedia Association

Vítejte v Praze!

After our meetups in Poland and France last year, we delighted the Czech DBpedia community with a DBpedia meetup. It was co-located with the XML Prague conference on February 7th, 2019.

First and foremost, we would like to thank Jirka Kosek (University of Economics, Prague), Milan Dojchinovski (AKSW/KILT, Czech Technical University in Prague), Tomáš Kliegr (KIZI/University of Economics, Prague) and, the XML Prague conference for co-hosting and support the event.

Opening the DBpedia community meetup

The Czech DBpedia community and the DBpedia Databus were in the focus of this meetup. Therefore, we invited local data scientists as well as DBpedia enthusiasts to discuss the state-of-the-art of the DBpedia databus. Sebastian Hellmann (AKSW/KILT) opened the meeting with an introduction to DBpedia and the DBpedia Databus. Following, Marvin Hofer explained how to use the DBpedia databus in combination with the Docker technology and, Johannes Frey (AKSW/KILT) presented the methods behind the DBpedia’s Data Fusion and Global ID Management.

Showcase Session

Marek Dudáš (KIZI/UEP) started the DBpedia Showcase Session with a presentation on “Concept Maps with the help of DBpedia”, where he showed the audience how to create a “concept map” with the ContextMinds application. Furthermore, Tomáš Kliegr (KIZI/UEP) presented “Explainable Machine Learning and Knowledge Graphs”. He explained his contribution to a rule-based classifier for business use cases. Two other showcases followed: Václav Zeman (KIZI/UEP), who presented “RdfRules: Rule Mining from DBpedia” and Denis Streitmatter (AKSW/KILT), who demonstrated the “DBpedia API”.

Miroslav Blasko presents “Ontology-based Dataset Exploration”

Closing this Session, Miroslav Blasko (CTU, Prague) gave a presentation on “Ontology-based Dataset Exploration”. He explained a taxonomy developed for dataset description. Additionally, he presented several use cases that have the main goal of improving content-based descriptors.

Summing up, the DBpedia meetup in Prague brought together more than 50 DBpedia enthusiasts from all over Europe. They engaged in vital discussions about Linked Data, the DBpedia databus, as well as DBpedia use cases and services.

 

 

 

In case you missed the event, all slides and presentations are available on our website. Further insights  feedback, and photos about the event can be found on Twitter via #DBpediaPrague.

We are currently looking forward to the next DBpedia Community Meeting, on May 23rd, 2019 in Leipzig, Germany. This meeting is co-located with the Language, Data and Knowledge (LDK) conference. Stay tuned and check Twitter, Facebook and the website or subscribe to our newsletter for the latest news and updates.

Your DBpedia Association

Call for Participation: DBpedia meetup @ XML Prague

We are happy to announce that the upcoming DBpedia meetup will be held in Prague, Czech Republic. During the XML conference Prague , Feb 7-9,  the DBpedia Community will get together on February 7, 2019.

Highlights

– Intro: DBpedia: Global and Unified Access to Knowledge (Graphs)

– DBpedia Databus presentation

– DBpedia Showcase Session

Quick Facts

– Web URL: https://wiki.dbpedia.org/meetings/Prague2019

– When: February 7th, 2019

– Where: University of Economics, nam. W. Churchilla 4, 130 67 Prague 3, Czech Republic

Schedule
Tickets

– Attending the DBpedia Community Meetup costs €40. DBpedia members get free admission, please contact your nearest DBpedia chapter or the DBpedia Association for a promotion code.

– You need to buy a ticket. Please check all details here: http://www.xmlprague.cz/conference-registration/

Sponsors and Acknowledgments

– XML conference Prague (http://www.xmlprague.cz/)

– Institute for Applied Informatics (http://infai.org/en/AboutInfAI)

– OpenLink Software (http://www.openlinksw.com/)

Organisation

-Milan Dojčinovski, AKSW/KILT

– Julia Holze, DBpedia Association

– Sebastian Hellmann, AKSW/KILT, DBpedia Association

– Tomáš Kliegr, KIZI/University of Economics, Prague

 

Tell us what cool things you do with DBpedia. If you would like to give a talk at the DBpedia meetup, please get in contact with the DBpedia Association.

We are looking forward to meeting you in Prague!

For latest news and updates check Twitter, Facebook and our Website or subscribe to our newsletter.

Your DBpedia Association

Grüezi Community!

More than 110 DBpedia enthusiasts joined the Community Meeting in Vienna.

After the success of the last two community meetings in Amsterdam and Leipzig, we thought it is time to meet you at the SEMANTiCS conference again. This year’s SEMANTiCS opened with the DBpedia Day on September 10th, 2018 in Vienna.

First and foremost, we would like to thank the Institute for Applied Informatics for supporting our community and many thanks to the Technical University Vienna and the SEMANTiCS for hosting our community meeting.

Opening Session

Javier Fernández

Javier David Fernández García, Vienna University of Economics, opened the meeting with his keynote Linked Open Data cloud – act now before it’s too late. He reflected on challenges towards arriving at a truly machine-readable and decentralized Web of Data. Javier reviewed the current state of affairs, highlighted key technical and non-technical challenges, and outlined potential solution strategies.

The second keynote speaker was Mathieu d’Aquin, Professor of Informatics at the Insight Centre for Data Analytics at NUI Galway. Mathieu, who is specialized in data analytics, completed the meeting with his keynote Dealing with Open Domain Data.

Mathieu d’Aquin

 

Showcase Session

Beyza Yaman

Patrik Schneider started the DBpedia Showcase Session with his presentation of the “NII (Japan) Research Showcase – A Knowledge Graph Management Framework for DBpedia”. Shortly after, Jan Forberg, from AKSW/KILT Leipzig, promoted the usage of WebIDs in a short how-to tutorial session. Adam Sanchez, from University Grenoble Alpes, talked about RDFization of a relational database from medicine domain by using Ontop. Followed by another presentation by Beyza Yaman, University of Genoa, talking about Exploiting Context-Dependent Quality Metadata for Linked Data Source Selection. Afterwards, Robert Bielinski, from AKSW/KILT Leipzig, introduced the new DBpedia release circle by using Apache Spark. Closing the Showcase Session, Tomas Kliegr, University of Economics Prague, presented a showcase using DBpedia to study cognitive biases affecting interpretation of machine learning results.

 

For further details of the presentations follow the links to the slides.

  • WebID Creation by Jan Forberg, AKSW/KILT slides
  • RDFization by Adam Sanchez, Université Grenoble Alpes slides
  • Exploiting Context-Dependent Quality Metadata by Beyza Yaman, University of Genoa slides
  • Extracting Data using Apache Spark by Robert Bielinski, AKSW/KILT slides
  • Using DBpedia to study cognitive biases affecting interpretation of machine learning results by Tomas Kliegr, University of Economics Prague slides
Parallel Session

Gary Munnelly

As a regular part of the DBpedia Community Meeting, we had two parallel sessions in the afternoon where DBpedians can discuss technical issues. Participants interested in NLP-related topics joined the NLP & DBpedia session. Milan Dojchinovski (AKSW/KILT) chaired this session with four very stimulating talks. Hereafter you will find all presentations given during this session:

 

Diego Moussallem

At the same time, the DBpedia Association Hour provided a platform for the community to discuss technical questions and especially the DBpedia databus. Sebastian Hellmann presented the DBpedia databus and explained the advantages of global IDs. Shortly after, Marvin Hofer (AKSW/KILT) demonstrated the new DBpedia global ID webinterface. Please find his slides here.

 

Afternoon Track

Enno Meijers

The 12th edition of the DBpedia Community Meeting also covered a special chapter session, chaired by Enno Meijers, from the Dutch DBpedia Language Chapter. The speakers presented the latest technical or organizational developments of their respective chapter.

Following, you find a list of all presentations of this session:

 

This session has mainly created an exchange platform for the different DBpedia chapters. For the first time, representatives of the European chapters discussed problems and challenges of DBpedia from their point of view. Furthermore, tools, applications and projects were presented by each chapter.

Jens Grivolla

Summing up, the 12th DBpedia Community Meeting brought together more than 110 DBpedia enthusiasts from Europe who engaged in vital discussions about Linked Data, the DBpedia databus as well as DBpedia use cases and services.

 

In case you missed the event, all slides and presentations are also available on our Website. Further insights, feedback and photos about the event are available on Twitter via #DBpediaDay.

We are now looking forward to more DBpedia meetings in the next years. So, stay tuned and check Twitter, Facebook and the Website or subscribe to our Newsletter for latest news and updates.

Yours

DBpedia Association

Beta-Test Updates

While everyone at the DBpedia Association was preparing for the SEMANTiCS Conference in Vienna, we also managed to reach an important milestone regarding the beta-test for our data release tool.

First and foremost, already 3500 files have been published with the plugin. These files will be part of the new DBpedia release and are available on our LTS repository.

Secondly, the documentation of the testing has been brought into good shape. Feel free to drop by and check it out.
Thirdly, we reached our first interoperability goal. The current metadata is sufficient to produce RSS 1.0 feeds. See here for further information. We also defined a loose roadmap on top of the readme, where interoperability to DCAT and DCAT-AP has high priority.

 

Now we have some time to support you and work one on one and also prepare the configurations to help you set up the data releases. Lastly, we already received data from DNB and SUMO, so we will start to look into these more closely.

Thanks to all the beta-testers for your nice work.

We keep you posted.

Yours

DBpedia Association

French DBpedia enthusiasts joined the meetup in Lyon.

Rencontre avec les français DBpédiens à Lyon

In cooperation with Thomas Riechert (HTWK/InfAI), the DBpedia Association organized our second DBpedia meetup this year, this time in Lyon. On July 3rd, 2018, we met the French DBpedia Community at the ENS in person and presented the vision of the new DBpedia Databus, an opportunity which simplifies the work with data.

First and foremost, we would like to thank the Institute for Applied Informatics for supporting our community and the LARHRA Laboratory as well as the ENS for hosting our community meetup. Special thanks go to Thomas Riechert and Vincent Alamercery (LARHRA Lyon) for organizing the event.

Opening Session

Sebastian Hellmann opened up the meetup in Lyon.

Sebastian Hellmann (AKSW/KILT) opened up the meetup in Lyon by introducing the DBpedia development strategy and the new DBpedia Databus to the French DBpedia community (slides). Afterwards, Elmahdi Korfed from INRIA presented new features and tools as results developed in  the French DBpedia chapter (slides):

In the following months, Elmahdi plans to work on the DBpedia historic live version and the DBpedia wiki commons. His research will be presented during our 12th DBpedia Community meeting on September 10th, in Vienna.

Following Elmahdi, Francesco Beretta presented LARHRA laboratory and its different research areas. In particular, he introduced the Data for History Consortium which is an international consortium founded in 2017 with the aim of improving geo-historical data interoperability in the semantic web.

Afternoon Track

The afternoon track started out with an inspiring presentation by Adam Sanchez from the University of Grenoble. He talked about ‘RDFization of a relational database from medicine domain using Ontop’ (slides) and introduced the Ontop mappings. Afterwards, Oscar Rodríguez Rocha (University of Côte d’Azur) showcased the application ‘Automatic Generation Educational Quizzes’ from DBpedia (slides) and explained how the automatic generation of quizzes works based on the game Les Incollables.

The meeting concluded with a dynamic discussion on the DBpedia Databus and potential collaborations between the DBpedia Association and the French DBpedia Chapter.

All slides and presentations are available on our Website. You can find more feedback and photos about the event on Twitter via #DBpediaLyon.

You still can’t get enough of DBpedia?

Don’t worry, we already have another meeting of the DBpedia community in the pipeline. Our 12th DBpedia Community meeting is scheduled for September 10th and preparations on the program are already in full swing. Our DBpedia Day will kick-off this year’s edition of SEMANTiCS 2018, hosted at TU Vienna and brings the European DBpedia community together.

You want to contribute? Please submit your proposal and be a part of our amazing program. Register here and meet us and other DBpedia enthusiasts in Vienna. We are looking forward to your contribution.  

For latest news and updates check Twitter, Facebook and our Website or subscribe to our newsletter.

See you soon!

Yours,

DBpedia Association

The DBpedia Databus – transforming Linked Data into a networked data economy

Working with data is hard and repetitive. That is why we are more than happy to announce the launch of the alpha version of our DBpedia Databus, a way that simplifies working with data. 

We have studied the data network for already 10 years and we conclude that organizations with open data are struggling to work together properly. Even though they could and should collaborate, they are hindered by technical and organizational barriers. They duplicate work on the same data. On the other hand, companies selling data cannot do so in a scalable way. The consumers are left empty-handed and trapped between the choice of inferior open data or buying from a jungle-like market. 

We need to rethink the incentives for linking data

Vision

We envision a hub, where everybody uploads data. In that hub, useful operations like versioning, cleaning, transformation, mapping, linking, merging, hosting are done automagically on a central communication system, the bus, and then again dispersed in a decentral network to the consumers and applications.  On the Databus, data flows from data producers through the platform to the consumers (left to right), any errors or feedback flows in the opposite direction and reaches the data source to provide a continuous integration service and improves the data at the source.

The DBpedia Databus is a platform that allows exchanging, curating and accessing data between multiple stakeholders. Any data entering the bus will be versioned, cleaned, mapped, linked and its licenses and provenance tracked. Hosting in multiple formats will be provided to access the data either as dump download or as API.

Publishing data on the Databus means connecting and comparing your data to the network

If you are grinding your teeth about how to publish data on the web, you can just use the Databus to do so. Data loaded on the bus will be highly visible, available and queryable. You should think of it as a service:

  • Visibility guarantees, that your citations and reputation goes up.
  • Besides a web download, we can also provide a Linked Data interface, SPARQL-endpoint, Lookup (autocomplete) or other means of availability (like AWS or Docker images).
  • Any distribution we are doing will funnel feedback and collaboration opportunities your way to improve your dataset and your internal data quality.
  • You will receive an enriched dataset, which is connected and complemented with any other available data (see the same folder names in data and fusion folders).

 How it works at the moment

Integration of data is easy with the Databus. We have been integrating and loading additional datasets alongside DBpedia for the world to query. Popular datasets are ICD10 (medical data) and organizations and persons. We are still in an initial state, but we already loaded 10 datasets (6 from DBpedia, 4 external) on the bus using these phases:

  1.  Acquisition: data is downloaded from the source and logged in.
  2. Conversion: data is converted to N-Triples and cleaned (Syntax parsing, datatype validation, and SHACL).
  3. Mapping: the vocabulary is mapped on the DBpedia Ontology and converted (We have been doing this for Wikipedia’s Infoboxes and Wikidata, but now we do it for other datasets as well).
  4. Linking: Links are mainly collected from the sources, cleaned and enriched.
  5. IDying: All entities found are given a new Databus ID for tracking.
  6.  Clustering: ID’s are merged onto clusters using one of the Databus ID’s as cluster representative.
  7. Data Comparison: Each dataset is compared with all other datasets. We have an algorithm that decides on the best value, but the main goal here is transparency, i.e. to see which data value was chosen and how it compares to the other sources.
  8. A main knowledge graph fused from all the sources, i.e. a transparent aggregate.
  9. For each source, we are producing a local fused version called the “Databus Complement”. This is a major feedback mechanism for all data providers, where they can see what data they are missing, what data differs in other sources and what links are available for their IDs.
  10. You can compare all data via a web service.

Contact us via dbpedia@infai.org if you would like to have additional datasets integrated and maintained alongside DBpedia.

From your point of view

Data Sellers

If you are selling data, the Databus provides numerous opportunities for you. You can link your offering to the open entities in the Databus. This allows consumers to discover your services better by showing it with each request.

Data Consumers

Open data on the Databus will be a commodity. We are greatly downing the cost of understanding the data, retrieving and reformatting it. We are constantly extending ways of using the data and are willing to implement any formats and APIs you need. If you are lacking a certain kind of data, we can also scout for it and load it onto the Databus.

Is it free?

Maintaining the Databus is a lot of work and servers incurring a high cost. As a rule of thumb, we are providing everything for free that we can afford to provide for free. DBpedia was providing everything for free in the past, but this is not a healthy model, as we can neither maintain quality properly nor grow.

On the Databus everything is provided “As is” without any guarantees or warranty. Improvements can be done by the volunteer community. The DBpedia Association will provide a business interface to allow guarantees, major improvements, stable maintenance, and hosting.

License

Final databases are licensed under ODC-By. This covers our work on recomposition of data. Each fact is individually licensed, e.g. Wikipedia abstracts are CC-BY-SA, some are CC-BY-NC, some are copyrighted. This means that data is available for research, informational and educational purposes. We recommend to contact us for any professional use of the data (clearing) so we can guarantee that legal matters are handled correctly. Otherwise, professional use is at own risk.

Current Statistics

The Databus data is available at http://downloads.dbpedia.org/databus/ ordered into three main folders:

  • Data: the data that is loaded on the Databus at the moment
  • Global: a folder that contains provenance data and the mappings to the new IDs
  • Fusion: the output of the Databus

Most notably you can find:

Update 21/8/2019: Data is now available via the Databus: https://databus.dbpedia.org/dbpedia/prefusion  , but without external datasets, full paper here.

  • Provenance mapping of the new ids in global/persistence-core/cluster-iri-provenance-ntriples/<http://downloads.dbpedia.org/databus/global/persistence-core/cluster-iri-provenance-ntriples/> and global/persistence-core/global-ids-ntriples/<http://downloads.dbpedia.org/databus/global/persistence-core/global-ids-ntriples/>
  • The final fused version for the core: fusion/core/fused/<http://downloads.dbpedia.org/databus/fusion/core/fused/>
  • A detailed JSON-LD file for data comparison: fusion/core/json/<http://downloads.dbpedia.org/databus/fusion/core/json/>
  • Complements, i.e. the enriched Dutch DBpedia Version: fusion/core/nl.dbpedia.org/<http://downloads.dbpedia.org/databus/fusion/core/nl.dbpedia.org/>

(Note that the file and folder structure are still subject to change)

Sources

Upcoming Developments

Data market
  • build your own data inventory and merchandise your data via Linked Data or via secure named graphs in the DBpedia SPARQL Endpoint (WebID + TLS + OpenLink’s  Virtuoso database)
DBpedia Marketplace
  • Offer your Linked Data tools, services, products
  • Incubate new research into products
  • Example: Support for RDFUnit (https://github.com/AKSW/RDFUnit created by the SHACL editor), assistance with SHACL writing and deployment of the open-source software

DBpedia and the Databus will transform Linked Data into a networked data economy

For any questions or inquiries related to the new DBpedia Databus, please contact us via dbpedia@infai.org

Yours,

DBpedia Association

DBpedia will meet the US-based Community

Only 8 days left to reserve your seat for our 3rd US DBpedia Community Meeting. We are happy to announce that the 11th DBpedia Meeting will be held in Cupertino, California on October 12th 2017, hosted by Apple Inc.

The meetup focuses on connecting the community interested in DBpedia and Knowledge Graphs in general, has included lightning talks by distinguished speakers (e.g. from Stanford, Google, IBM Watson, Netflix, LinkedIn, Wikimedia Foundation, Nuance, etc.). Talk topics have extended also to natural language processing, knowledge representation, information extraction, integration and retrieval, graph databases, knowledge base embeddings and machine learning.

We are looking forward to meeting again in person with the US-based DBpedia Community.

Quick facts

  • Host: Apple Inc.
  • Registration: through eventbrite (limited seats)

Schedule

Please check our schedule for the next DBpedia Community Meeting here: http://wiki.dbpedia.org/meetings/California2017

Acknowledgments

If you would like to become a sponsor for the 11th DBpedia Meeting, please contact the DBpedia Association.

Apple Inc. For sponsoring catering and hosting our meetup on their campus.
Google Summer of Code 2017 Amazing program and the reason some of our core DBpedia devs are visiting California
ALIGNED – Software and Data Engineering For funding the development of DBpedia as a project use-case and covering part of the travel cost
Institute for Applied Informatics For supporting the DBpedia Association
OpenLink Software For continuous hosting of the main DBpedia Endpoint

Organisation

Registration

Attending the DBpedia Community Meeting is free of charge, but seats are limited. Make sure to register to reserve a seat.

We are looking forward to meeting you in California.

Check our website for further updates, follow us on #twitter or subscribe to our newsletter.

Your DBpedia Association