Tag Archives: DBpedia

DBpedia supports young developers

Supporting young and aspiring developers has always been part of DBpedia‘s philosophy. Through various internships and collaborations with programmes such as Google Summer of Code, we were able to not only meet aspiring developers but also establish long-lasting relationships with these DBpedians ensuring a sustainable progress for and with DBpedia.  For 6 years now, we have been part of Google Summer of Code, one of our favorite programmes. This year, we are also taking part in Coding da Vinci, a German-based cultural data hackathon, where we support young hackers, coders and smart minds with DBpedia datasets.

DBpedia at Google Summer of Code 2018

This year, DBpedia will participate for the sixth time in a row in the Google Summer of Code program (GSoC). Together with our amazing mentors, we drafted 9 project ideas which GSOC applicants could apply to. Since March 12th, we received many proposal drafts out of which 12 final projects proposals have been submitted. Competition is very high as student slots are always limited. Our DBpedia mentors were critically reviewing all proposals for their potential and for allocating them one of the rare open slots in the GSoC program. Finally, on Monday, April 23rd, our 6 finalists have been announced. We are very proud and looking forward to the upcoming months of coding. The following projects have been accepted and will hopefully be realized during the summer.

Our gang of DBpedia mentors comprises of very experienced developers that are working with us on this project for several years now. Speaking of sustainability, we also have former GSoC students on board, who get the chance to mentor projects building on ideas of past GSoC’s. And while students and mentors start bonding, we are really looking forward to the upcoming months of coding – may it be inspiring, fun and fruitful.  

 

DBpedia @ Coding da Vinci 2018

As already mentioned in the previous newsletter, DBpedia is part of the CodingDaVinciOst 2018. Founded in Berlin in 2014, Coding da Vinci is a platform for cultural heritage institutions and the hacker, developer, designer, and gamer community to jointly develop new creative applications from cultural open data during a series of hackathon events. In this year’s edition, DBpedia provides its datasets to support more than 30 cultural institutions, enriching their datasets in order participants of the hackathon can make the most out of the data. Among the participating cultural institutions are, for example, the university libraries of Chemnitz, Jena, Halle, Freiberg, Dresden and Leipzig as well as the Sächsisches Staatsarchiv, Museum für Druckkunst Leipzig, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Duchess Anna Amalia Library, and the Museum Burg Posterstein.

CodingDaVinciOst 2018, the current edition of the hackathon, hosted a kick-off weekend at the Bibliotheca Albertina, the University Library in Leipzig. During the event, DBpedia offered a hands-on workshop for newbies and interested hackathon participants who wanted to learn about how to enrich their project ideas with DBpedia or how to solve potential problems in their projects with DBpedia.

We are now looking forward to the upcoming weeks of coding and hacking and can’t wait to see the results on June 18th, when the final projects will be presented and awarded. We wish all the coders and hackers a pleasant and happy hacking time. Check our DBpedia Twitter for updates and latest news.  

If you have any questions, like to support us in any way or if you like to learn more about DBpedia, just drop us a line via dbpedia@infai.org

Yours,
DBpedia Association

Meeting with the US-DBpedians – A Wrap-Up

One lightning event after the other. Just four weeks after our Amsterdam Community Meeting, we crossed the Atlantic for the third time to meet with over 110 US-based DBpedia enthusiasts. This time, the DBpedia Community met in Cupertino, California and was hosted at Apple Inc. 

Main Event

First and foremost, we would like to thank Apple for the warm welcome and the hosting of the event.

After a Meet & Greet with refreshments, Taylor Rhyne, Eng. Product Manager at Apple, and Pablo N. Mendes, Researcher at Apple and chair of the DBpedia Community Committee, opened the main event with a short introduction setting the tone for the following 2 hours.

The main event attracted attendees with eleven invited talks from major companies of the Bay Area actively using DBpedia or interested in knowledge graphs in general such as Diffbot, IBM, Wikimedia, NTENT, Nuance, Volley and Stardog Union.

Tommaso Soru – University of Leipzig

Tommaso Soru (University of Leipzig), DBpedia mentor in our Google Summer of Code (GSoC) projects, opened the invited talks session with the updates from the DBpedia developer community. This year, DBpedia participated in the GSoC 2017 program with 7 different projects including “First Chatbot for DBpedia”, which was selected as Best DBpedia GSoC Project 2017. His presentation is available here. 

DBpedia likes to thank the following poeple for organizinga nd hosting our Community Meeting in Cupertino, California.

Further Acknowledgments

 

Apple Inc. For sponsoring catering and hosting our meetup on their campus.
Google Summer of Code 2017 Amazing program and the reason some of our core DBpedia devs are visiting California
ALIGNED – Software and Data Engineering For funding the development of DBpedia as a project use-case and covering part of the travel cost
Institute for Applied Informatics For supporting the DBpedia Association
OpenLink Software For continuous hosting of the main DBpedia Endpoint

Invited Talks- A Short Recap

Filipe Mesquita (Diffbot) introduced the new DBpedia NLP Department, born from a recent partnership between our organization and the California based company, which aims at creating the most accurate and comprehensive database of human knowledge. His presentation is available here. Dan Gruhl (IBM Research) held a presentation about the in-house development of an omnilingual ontology and how DBpedia data supported this

Filipe Mesquita – Diffbot

endeavor. Stas Malyshev representative for Dario Taraborelli (both Wikimedia Foundation) presented the current state of the structured data initiatives at Wikidata and the query capabilities for Wikidata. Their slides are available here and here. Ricardo Baeza-Yates (NTENT) gave a short talk on mobile semantic search.

The second part of the event saw Peter F. Patel-Schneider (Nuance) holding a presentation with the title “DBpedia from the Fringe” giving some insights on how DBpedia could be further improved. Shortly after, Sebastian Hellmann, Executive Director of the DBpedia Association, walked the stage and presented the state of the art of the association, including achievements and future goals. Sanjay Krishnan (U.C. Berkeley) talked about the link between AlphaGo and data cleansing. You can find his slides here.  Bill Andersen (Volley.com) argued for the use of extremely precise and fine-grained approaches to deal with small data. His presentation is available here. Finally, Michael Grove (Stardog Union) stressed on the view of knowledge graphs as knowledge toolkits backed by a graph data model.

Michael Grove – Stardog Union

The event concluded with refreshments, snacks and drinks served in the atrium allowing to talk about the presented topics, discuss the latest developments in the field of knowledge graphs and network between all participants. In the end, this closing session was way longer than had been planned.

GSoC Mentor Summit

Shortly after the CA Community Meeting, our DBpedia mentors Tommaso Soru and Magnus Knuth participated at the Google Summer of Code Mentor Summit held in Sunnyvale California. During free sessions hosted by mentors of diverse open source organizations, Tommaso and Magnus presented selected projects during their lightning talks. Beyond open source, open data topics have been targeted in multiple sessions, as this is not only relevant for research, but there is also a strong need in software projects. The meetings paved the way for new collaborations in various areas, e.g. the field of question answering over the DBpedia knowledge corpus, in particular the use of Neural SPARQL Machines for the translation of natural language into structured queries. We expect that this hot deep-learning topic will be featured in the next edition of GSoC projects. Overall, it has been a great experience to meet so many open source fellows from all over the world.

Upcoming events

After the event is before another ….

Connected Data London, November 16th, 2017.

Sebastian Hellmann, executive director of the DBpedia Association will present Data Quality and Data Usage in a large-scale Multilingual Knowledge Graph during the content track at the Connected Data in London. He will also join the panelists in the late afternoon panel discussion about Linked Open Data: Is it failing or just getting out of the blocks? Feel free to join the event and support DBpedia.

A message for all  DBpedia enthusiasts – our next Community Meeting

Currently we are planning our next Community Meeting  and would like to invite DBpedia enthusiasts and chapters who like to host a meeting to send us their ideas to dbpedia@infai.org. The meeting is scheduled for the beginning of 2018. Any suggestions regarding place, time, program and topics are welcome!  

Check our website for further updates, follow us on #twitter or subscribe to our newsletter.

We will keep you posted

Your DBpedia Association

Career Opportunities at DBpedia – A Success Story

Google summer of Code is a global program focused on introducing students to open source software development.

During the 3 months summer break from university, students work on a programming projects  with an open source organization, like DBpedia. 

We are part of this exciting program for more than 5 years now. Many exciting projects developed as results of intense coding during hot summers. Presenting you Wouter Maroy, who has been a GSoC student at GSoc 2016 and who is currently a mentor in this years program, we like to give you a glimpse behind the scenes and show you how important the program is to DBpedia.


Success Story: Wouter Maroy

Who are you?

I’m Wouter Maroy, a 23 years old Master’s student in Computer Science Engineering at Ghent University (Belgium). I’m affiliated with IDLab – imec. Linked Data and Big Data technologies are my two favorite fields of interest. Besides my passion for Computer Science, I like to travel, explore and look for adventures. I’m a student who enjoys his student life in Ghent.  

What is your main interest in DBpedia and what was your motivation to apply for a DBpedia project at GSoC 2016.

I took courses during my Bachelors with lectures about Linked Data and the Semantic Web which of course included DBpedia; it’s an interesting research field. Before my GSoC 2016 application I did some work on Semantic Web technologies and on a technology (RML) that was required for a GSoC 2016 project that was listed by DBpedia. I wanted to get involved in Open Source and DBpedia, so I applied.

What did you do?

DBpedia has used a custom mapping language up until now to generate structured data from raw data from Wikipedia infoboxes. A next step was to improve this process to a more modular and generic approach that leads to higher quality linked data generation . This new approach relied on the integration of RML, the RDF Mapping Language and was the goal of the GSoC 2016 project I applied for. Understanding all the necessary details about the GSoC project required some effort and research before I started with coding. I also had to learn a new programming language (Scala). I had good assistance from my mentors so this turned out very well in the end.  DBpedia’s Extraction Framework, which is used for extracting structured data from Wikipedia, has a quite large codebase. It was the first project of this size I was involved in. I learned a lot from reading its codebase and from contributing by writing code during these months.

Dimitris Kontokostas and Anastasia Dimou were my two mentors. They guided me well throughout the project. I interacted daily with them through Slack and each week we had a conference call to discuss the project.  After many months of research, coding and discussing we managed to deliver a working prototype at the end of the project. The work we did was presented in Leipzig on the DBpedia day during SEMANTICS 16’. Additionally, this work will also be presented at ISWC 2017.

You can check out his project here.

How do you currently contribute to improve DBpedia?  

I’m mentoring a GSoC17 project together with Dimitris Kontokostas and Anastasia Dimou as a follow up on the work that was done by our GSoC 2016 project last year. Ismael Rodriguez is the new student who is participating in the project and he already delivered great work! Besides being a mentor for GSoC 2017, I make sure that the integration of RML into DBpedia is going into the right direction in general (managing, coding,…). For this reason, I worked at the KILT/DBpedia office in Leipzig during summer for 6 weeks. Joining and getting to know the team was a great experience.

What did you gain from the project?

Throughout the project I practiced coding, working in a team, … I learned more about DBpedia, RML, Linked Data and other related technologies. I’m glad I had the opportunity to learn this much from the project. I would recommend it to all students who are curious about DBpedia, who are eager to learn and who want to earn a stipend during summer through coding. You’ll learn a lot and you’ll have a good time!

Final words to future GSoC applicants for DBpedia projects.

Give it a shot! Really, it’s a lot of fun! Coding for DBpedia through GSoC is a great, unique experience and one who is enthusiastic about coding and the DBpedia project should definitely go for it.

Check our website for further updates, follow us on #twitter or subscribe to our newsletter.

Yours

DBpedia Association