Tag Archives: support

DBpedia Forum – New Ways to Exchange about DBpedia

From now on, in addition to our newsletter and slack as a means for communication, we have a new platform for exchange and support around DBpedia – the DBpedia Forum.

With part  II of our growth hack series, we would like to introduce you to the latest feature of our development – the new DBpedia Forum.

Why a new forum?

DBpedia has an inclusionist model and DBpedia is huge. At the core, there is data extracted from Wikipedia and Wikidata. Around this, there are derived datasets like the fusion/enrichment and also LHD. Additionally, we offer services such as DBpedia Spotlight, DBpedia Lookup, SameAs, and not to forget the main endpoint http://dbpedia.org/sparql as well as our DBpedia Chapters. All of this is surrounded by 25k academic papers and a vivid business network.

Since we have this inclusionist model, we believe that access to data and knowledge should be global and unified (and free where possible). That is exactly why we established the DBpedia Forum –  to further this mission. 

Welcome!

The DBpedia Forum is a shared community resource — a place to share skills, knowledge, and interests through an ongoing conversation about DBpedia and related topics. It is meant (among others) to replace our old support page for assistance with DBpedia. In the long run, we will shut down our (former) support page, as it is not serving our growing needs anymore. 

This is what the forum currently looks like. Traffic and communication are still a little low. Start your conversation about DBpedia here and now.

Where are all the DBpedians?

We figured, most of you are already actively involved in exchange about DBpedia. However, the majority of that is scattered all over the web which makes it hard for us and others to keep track of. With the new forum, we offer you a playground for vivid exchange, and to meet and greet fellow DBpedians – a platform for everyone’s benefit. 

The DBpedia Forum simplifies communication

Make this a great place for discussion by contributing yourself. It is super easy. Just visit https://forum.dbpedia.org/, browse the topics, and find the info that helps you or add your own. If you want to contribute just register and off you go. Improve the discussion by discovering ones that are already happening. Help us influence the future of the DBpedia community by engaging in discussions that make this forum an interesting place to be. 

Transparency is all

To assist with maintaining an appropriate code of conduct the forum utilizes little discourse tools that enable the community to collectively identify the best (and worst) contributions. The forum tracks bookmarks, likes, flags, replies, edits, and many more. That is similar to the ranking in the old support system but much more transparent and much more fun.

For the hunter-gatherers among you, you can also earn batches for various activities  – as long as you are active.  And if you feel very passionate about a certain topic, we would gladly make you a moderator – just let us know.  

Now is the time

Since you are already talking about DBpedia somewhere on the WWW, why not do it here and now for everyone else to follow? Your knowledge and skills are key, not only for individuals in this forum but also for the whole DBpedia community. 

Happy posting and stay tuned for part III in the growth hack series. The next post will feature timbr – DBpedia SQL Semantic Knowledge Platform.

Yours,

DBpedia Association

DBpedia Chapters – Survey Evaluation – Episode Two

Welcome back to part two of the evaluation of the surveys, we conducted with the DBpedia chapters.

Survey Evaluation – Episode Two

The second survey focused on technical matters. We asked the chapters about the usage of DBpedia services and tools, technical problems and challenges and potential reasons to overcome them.  Have a look below.

Again, only nine out of 21 DBpedia chapters participated in this survey. And again, that means, the results only represent roughly 42% of the DBpedia chapter population

The good news is, all chapters maintain a local DBpedia endpoint. Yay! More than 55 % of the chapters perform their own extraction. The rest of them apply a hybrid approach reusing some datasets from DBpedia releases and additionally, extract some on their own.

Datasets, Services and Applications

In terms of frequency of dataset updates, the situation is as follows:  44,4 % of the chapters update them once a year. The answers of the remaining ones differ in equal shares, depending on various factors. See the graph below. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When it comes to the maintenance of links to local datasets, most of the chapters do not have additional ones. However, some do maintain links to, for example, Greek WordNet, the National Library of Greece Authority record, Geonames.jp and the Japanese WordNet. Furthermore, some of the chapters even host other datasets of local interest, but mostly in a separate endpoint, so they keep separate graphs.

Apart from hosting their own endpoint, most chapters maintain one or the other additional service such as Spotlight, LodLive or LodView.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Moreover,  the chapters have additional applications they developed on top of DBpedia data and services.

Besides, they also gave us some reasons why they were not able to deploy DBpedia related services. See their replies below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DBpedia Chapter set-up

Lastly, we asked the technical heads of the chapters what the hardest task for setting up their chapter had been.  The answers, again, vary as the starting position of each chapter differed. Read a few of their replies below.

The hardest technical task for setting up the chapter was:

  • to keep virtuoso up to date
  • the chapter specific setup of DBpedia plugin in Virtuoso
  • the Extraction Framework
  • configuring Virtuoso for serving data using server’s FQDN and Nginx proxying
  • setting up the Extraction Framework, especially for abstracts
  • correctly setting up the extraction process and the DBpedia facet browser
  • fixing internationalization issues, and updating the endpoint
  • keeping the extraction framework working and up to date
  • updating the server to the specific requirements for further compilation – we work on Debian

 

Final  words

With all the data and results we gathered, we will get together with our chapter coordinator to develop a strategy of how to improve technical as well as organizational issues the surveys revealed. By that, we hope to facilitate a better exchange between the chapters and with us, the DBpedia Association. Moreover, we intend to minimize barriers for setting up and maintaining a DBpedia chapter so that our chapter community may thrive and prosper.

In the meantime, spread your work and share it with the community. Do not forget to follow and tag us on Twitter ( @dbpedia ). You may also want to subscribe to our newsletter.

We will keep you posted about any updates and news.

Yours

DBpedia Association

DBpedia supports young developers

Supporting young and aspiring developers has always been part of DBpedia‘s philosophy. Through various internships and collaborations with programmes such as Google Summer of Code, we were able to not only meet aspiring developers but also establish long-lasting relationships with these DBpedians ensuring a sustainable progress for and with DBpedia.  For 6 years now, we have been part of Google Summer of Code, one of our favorite programmes. This year, we are also taking part in Coding da Vinci, a German-based cultural data hackathon, where we support young hackers, coders and smart minds with DBpedia datasets.

DBpedia at Google Summer of Code 2018

This year, DBpedia will participate for the sixth time in a row in the Google Summer of Code program (GSoC). Together with our amazing mentors, we drafted 9 project ideas which GSOC applicants could apply to. Since March 12th, we received many proposal drafts out of which 12 final projects proposals have been submitted. Competition is very high as student slots are always limited. Our DBpedia mentors were critically reviewing all proposals for their potential and for allocating them one of the rare open slots in the GSoC program. Finally, on Monday, April 23rd, our 6 finalists have been announced. We are very proud and looking forward to the upcoming months of coding. The following projects have been accepted and will hopefully be realized during the summer.

Our gang of DBpedia mentors comprises of very experienced developers that are working with us on this project for several years now. Speaking of sustainability, we also have former GSoC students on board, who get the chance to mentor projects building on ideas of past GSoC’s. And while students and mentors start bonding, we are really looking forward to the upcoming months of coding – may it be inspiring, fun and fruitful.  

 

DBpedia @ Coding da Vinci 2018

As already mentioned in the previous newsletter, DBpedia is part of the CodingDaVinciOst 2018. Founded in Berlin in 2014, Coding da Vinci is a platform for cultural heritage institutions and the hacker, developer, designer, and gamer community to jointly develop new creative applications from cultural open data during a series of hackathon events. In this year’s edition, DBpedia provides its datasets to support more than 30 cultural institutions, enriching their datasets in order participants of the hackathon can make the most out of the data. Among the participating cultural institutions are, for example, the university libraries of Chemnitz, Jena, Halle, Freiberg, Dresden and Leipzig as well as the Sächsisches Staatsarchiv, Museum für Druckkunst Leipzig, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Duchess Anna Amalia Library, and the Museum Burg Posterstein.

CodingDaVinciOst 2018, the current edition of the hackathon, hosted a kick-off weekend at the Bibliotheca Albertina, the University Library in Leipzig. During the event, DBpedia offered a hands-on workshop for newbies and interested hackathon participants who wanted to learn about how to enrich their project ideas with DBpedia or how to solve potential problems in their projects with DBpedia.

We are now looking forward to the upcoming weeks of coding and hacking and can’t wait to see the results on June 18th, when the final projects will be presented and awarded. We wish all the coders and hackers a pleasant and happy hacking time. Check our DBpedia Twitter for updates and latest news.  

If you have any questions, like to support us in any way or if you like to learn more about DBpedia, just drop us a line via dbpedia@infai.org

Yours,
DBpedia Association